The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Urgent help required!

ValerieC's picture
ValerieC

Urgent help required!

I am about to begin the final ferment of Yohan Ferrant's Do Nothing Bread (my first attempt!)  the bulk ferment has been going for 18 hours at 21C in my Brod and Taylor. Should I do the final ferment at the same temperature or something higher, say 24 or 25C? I'd be very grateful for some instant help from anyone who is currently on line. Valerie

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Something out by now.  I'm not familiar with the recipe but quickly looking at the recipes tell me that the dough should be shaped after it has doubled in volume.  Did it do that? Final proofing time will also vary with temp so be on your toes.  As with most sourdoughs, I would not let the proof reach double but bake it before it gets that big.

https://forum.breadtopia.com/t/yohan-ferrants-do-nothing-bread/3992/2

ValerieC's picture
ValerieC

Many thanks for your response, Mini. Yes, I did go ahead and did a short final ferment at 24C . The bread had great oven spring, great flavour and a crumb openness that I found adequate. The only problem was one that I have with all my breads and for which I have never been able to find a solution. In spite of long baking, my loaves always feel a little damp and leave a gummy residue on the knife when  they are sliced. The bread is fine when toasted but I would like to know if others find this problem with bread made with a high percentage of wholegrain. I would like to bake 100% w/w but at present I am using only 80%. Unfortunately, this reduction has not helped with the problem. I have made every modification I can think of but to no avail. Valerie

 

joe_n's picture
joe_n

Hi,

I noticed that gumminess (to varying degrees) has to do with the size of the pan.

If a 500g wholewheat flour (90% hydration, 450 gr water) is baked as 1 boule baked to 208-210F, there is a slight gumminess.  If I split the dough into 3 smaller ones, then the gumminess is gone.

I have some dough ready to go tomorrow and will probably bake them as smaller ones.  Another advantage is that the crust will keep the bread fresher longer since they won't be cut open until they are to be eaten.

Hope this helps!

 

PS I use Elly's 100% ww recipe on YT.

 

ValerieC's picture
ValerieC

Your comments are very interesting, Joe. Thank you for this suggestion. I usually bake weekly. 1kg flour, 90% hydration, which I bake as two boules. I will have a look at Elly's YT post. Currently I bake my loaves for 2 hrs and still   have the dreaded gumminess! Valerie

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

in hydration.  More surface area ---> more water leaving the loaf during the bake.

breadyandwaiting's picture
breadyandwaiting

Since you've tried a lot of recipe modifications without luck, one thing to suggest: how long are you waiting after pulling out of the oven to slice into the loaf? If you're doing it immediately, try giving it some time before cutting open. 

ValerieC's picture
ValerieC

Many thanks for your reply. I have learned so much from the experienced bakers on this site. I never slice the loaf until the next day, so the answer must lie elsewhere. I am beginning to wonder if a high percentage of wholewheat characteristically produces a moister loaf than white flour. Valerie

David R's picture
David R

... of those situations where too much fermentation can cause gummy results, because the flour has been broken down a bit too well? I'm not experienced enough to know.

ValerieC's picture
ValerieC

Nor I David. I suppose I will  keep on modifying one thing at a time until I accidentally hit on a solution! Maurizio at The Perfect Loaf has a recipe for a 100% wholewheat loaf that seems to turn out beautifully but therre is no way I could bake my bread for only one hour. Many thanks for your response. Valerie

ValerieC's picture
ValerieC

Nor I David. I suppose I will  keep on modifying one thing at a time until I accidentally hit on a solution! Maurizio at The Perfect Loaf has a recipe for a 100% wholewheat loaf that seems to turn out beautifully but therre is no way I could bake my bread for only one hour. Many thanks for your response. Valerie

David R's picture
David R

There are really only two kinds of bread recipes: Works, and Doesn't Work. As long as it fits the first category and not the second one, who cares how long it takes (or doesn't take) in the oven?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

or giving the loaf an extra 5 min in the oven?  Got any pictures?