The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Cracked 9 grains - what do I do?

meandb's picture
meandb

Cracked 9 grains - what do I do?

  After living in Austria for 10 years, we have developed a love for good bread!  I now live in Lancaster PA and at a farmer's market, recently came across a "9 Grain Mix - Cracked" of hard red wheat, oats, triticale, rye, barley, soft white wheat, spelt, hard white wheat and flax.  I'd love to make bread with this, and figured I'd grind it down in my "magic bullet".  Can someone tell me what else I have to do, if anything to make this a decent flour?  Do I replace bread flour in a recipe one for one, or should I use some other flour like whole wheat or rye in combination?  Do I have to soak this grain mixture?  I'm so new at this - please help!  Thanks!

 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

=== Do I replace bread flour in a recipe one for one, or should I use some other flour like whole wheat or rye in combination? Do I have to soak this grain mixture? I'm so new at this - please help! Thanks! ===

Head to the library, of course!

I would suggest starting out with a recipe that uses some of the cracked grains directly before trying to grind them into flour. Rose Levy Beranbaum's _The Bread Bible_ has a good recipe for the "9-Grain Semolina Torpedo" and Peter Reinhart's new _Whole Grain Breads_ has several recipes that use a portion of multi-grain mix (as do his previous books - he classifies most but not all of them as 'straun').

In general these recipes call for the grains to be mixed with hot water and some salt (to prevent fermentation) and left to sit overnight either on the counter or in the refrigerator. They are then added to a dough made with your choice of whole grain or bread flours.

sPh

 

pumpkinpapa's picture
pumpkinpapa

If you do soak them, remember that flax only needs about 4 hours whereas the rest will do with a good overnight soak. I've used a similar mix in this recipe

spsq's picture
spsq

This is the recipe I use most often.  It's delicious, easy, flexible and consistent!

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4277/multigrain-struan

HogieWan's picture
HogieWan

I was going to try grinding malted barley into flour this weeked with my magic bullet.  Let me know if you try it.