The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bread Nutrition Facts

SarahAnne17's picture
SarahAnne17

Bread Nutrition Facts

Hi guys! I'm new to the bread world and was wondering how you would calculate how many carbs are in a slice of homemade bread? 

I used 500g of flour, 375g of water, 8g of yeast and 10g of salt. The final product weighted 770g, but when I log it into MyFitnessPal, that won't calculate the weight of the water. How would I go about making sure I get the proper calculation? 

Thanks!

Sarah

Justanoldguy's picture
Justanoldguy

I'm not a math whiz, but just for the sake of argument lets assume that there are 95 carbs in 125 grams of flour. that would mean that the loaf would have 380g of carbs from that source. If you're getting any carbs in your water you should retain an attorney and go after your utility district in court. Let's just figure on roughly 3g of carbs in your yeast. If there are any carbs in your salt perhaps your attorney will do two suits for the price of one. So we've got 383g of carbs in your loaf. Now the ball is in your court; how many slices per loaf?  For example: 383g of carbs in a loaf that's divided into 12 slices would mean that the average two-slice sandwich would have a minimum of 64g of carbs wrapped around it's contents. Note please that the contents would have a wide range of carburation (is that the right word?) depending entirely on their nature. For example a lard versus celery sandwich or deep fat fried bacon and banana versus peanut butter and gravel. This may or may not be an accurate assessment but I had fun trying and, because I was using both hands to type I couldn't open the cookie jar.

David R's picture
David R

...if your oven is fuel injected. 🙂

pmccool's picture
pmccool

is the non plus ultra of carb freedom.

Paul

leemid51's picture
leemid51

The only way I am willing to reduce the number of carbs is to fuel inject. I never succeeded in tuning carbs anyway. I did learn how to remove carbs and install injection. Not only do you get better mileage, you get a better power to fuel ratio. OOOh! a Freudian slip! I originally typed ration instead of ratio.

David R's picture
David R

... 500 grams of flour,

 

then divide that by the number of slices. Done.

Justanoldguy's picture
Justanoldguy

You may be owed an apology. I have a weakness for puns - carbohydrates/carburation - and I am not alone in that weakness. I am not familiar with MyFitnessPal (a fact that my bathroom scale will gladly proclaim) but counting carbohydrates is important to a great many people. So here's the drill I'd follow if I wanted to determine the carbohydrates in a slice of home baked bread. Check the nutrition label on the flour's packaging. It will tell you the carbs in the amount of flour it designates as a single serving and give you a weight for that amount. Divide that serving weight into the weight of flour you used in your loaf and then multiply the result by the grams of carbs in the serving weight. You will then have the total carbs in your loaf. Divide the total carbs by the number of slices you normally make from that loaf to determine the carbs in the average slice. Water has no carbs; salt should not have any either. Any carbs contributed by yeast would be insignificant. Ignore the final weight of the loaf because the water, salt and yeast constitute part of it and they do not contribute to the loaf's carb content. DavidR's analysis is correct. All your results will be approximate but they'll be 'close enough for government work'.