The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Fresh Milled Wheat - storage

rgrgeo's picture
rgrgeo

Fresh Milled Wheat - storage

If you mill whole grain wheat into flour do you really need to store it in the freezer?  

I have to ask this because I truly have not found a definitive answer.

when I started milling fresh whole wheat (using the Mockmill 100) I was keeping it in the refrigerator and using it within 1 to 2 weeks.  This seemed fine to me.  However, I read somewhere that keeping it the freezer was the best way to preserve it, and that you run a higher risk of it spoiling quickly by keeping it in the refrigerator.  

Since then, I have been keeping it in the freezer, but I truly don't know if it is makes a difference.  I have researched this and find little info about fresh milled wheat storage.  

If any one with experience with milling their wheat could offer any insight into this, I would really appreciate it. 

 

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Why not mill on demand? That is what most of us do. 

Dan

rgrgeo's picture
rgrgeo

Dan, 

Timing is the simple answer.  I haven't always had the time to grind when I can bake.  

Additinally, I also had read that the flour needs to rest for some time before baking so I always thought I needed to grind in advance of baking, at least for that reason.  Although, recently I have heard this is not the case. 

I am actually pretty new to home milling my own wheat with the Mockmill and have just now gotten used to the process, so I will probably mill on demand from here out.  

Thanks for responding.

 

 

 

rgrgeo's picture
rgrgeo

Dan, 

Timing is the simple answer.  I haven't always had the time to grind when I can bake.  

Additinally, I also had read that the flour needs to rest for some time before baking so I always thought I needed to grind in advance of baking, at least for that reason.  Although, recently I have heard this is not the case. 

I am actually pretty new to home milling my own wheat with the Mockmill and have just now gotten used to the process, so I will probably mill on demand from here out.  

Thanks for responding.

 

 

 

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

I mill and either use it right away, or store it in the freezer.  I have read that it is okay in the fridge, but will go bad much quicker in the fridge than the freezer.  While I usually use it up pretty quickly, sometimes I made special batches, such as pancake mix, and it is just more convenient for me to store them all in the freezer.    There are some who suggest it should be aged, but I have not ever tried to do that.  

rgrgeo's picture
rgrgeo

I have heard the aging thing as well, but recently heard of someone using immediately after milling with no issues.  

I appreciate your confirming about keeping it in freezer, I heard the same thing, but was just wondering if it was necessary. 

Either way, using it up quickly, or grinding on demand (as Dan pointed out) appears to resolve any concerns about storage.

David R's picture
David R

... sounds like an old spouses' tale. ☺️

 

If there is a legitimate and demonstrable reason, I'll happily retract my disbelief.

rgrgeo's picture
rgrgeo

Think you are right about that.  

Recent post on insta described direct mill to mix experiencing zero issues and resulting in great bread.  

I am inclined to believe this is an old spouses tale myself.  

Overall, there is very little info out there on home milling though.  

 

David R's picture
David R

because, relative to commercial flour, home milling is expensive and inconvenient; and commercial flour is usually easy to get.

Justanoldguy's picture
Justanoldguy

I mill on demand using a Mockmill KitchenAide attachment. As to time - it might add four minutes to the overall bake time. That's certainly less time than warming up flour from -10f to room temperature would take. In fact, I'm convinced that the temp of my freshly milled flour, 107f, enhances the action of autolysis and/or whatever leavening I'm using. The only freshly milled flours that I keep in the fridge are the small quantities I use for feeding starters. I decided to take up home milling in an effort to boost the flavor and nutritional value of the breads I bake. The fact that wheat and rye berries, corn kernels and oat groats can easily be stored whole for long periods without any investment of additional energy such as freezing or refrigeration adds to the appeal of home milling. From what I've read the idea of aging flour relates to inhibiting the oxidation of the oils in the wheat germ and to some compounds, thiols, that can interfere with gluten development and phytic acids that can interfere with the uptake of some nutrients. I dunno about that, anytime I'm shirtless and look down toward my toes I can clearly see that there's very little nutritional deprivation in my diet.  

rgrgeo's picture
rgrgeo

I appreciate your detailed response.  

I am definitely on-board with on demand milling after hearing from you and Dan.  Up until now the milling as been somewhat of a "project" as I have been learning how best manage the Mockmill (there was a bit of a learning curve), but I think I am at the point where I can make it work as part of process with each bake. 

Thanks for pointing out all the benefits of your milling before baking.

Riley's picture
Riley

I do freeze a lot of grains.  I freeze in glass jars so as not to impart other flavors and also because it’s more airtight than storing in plastic.  I tend to freeze any grains I’m not going to use right away as well as bread addi-in’s like seeds and nuts.  

rgrgeo's picture
rgrgeo

I agree, for longer term storage I would definitely store in the freezer.  In my experience, a week or so in the refrigerator isn't bad though.  

Probably best to err on the side of caution.