The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

2019 Bulk Grain Storage thread

netfan's picture
netfan

2019 Bulk Grain Storage thread

I've been pouring over so many resources and not finding much, but I was hoping that those of you in the know could help update some information on storing whole grains.  What containers?  What sizes?  How to keep airtight?  Where to store?  How to stay bug free?  Most things I've seen in the forums are years old.  If you can add to the thread with details, updated links and pics, it would be awesome!

Thanks!

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

1. I use food safe 5 gallon buckets from Home Depot. I bought Gamma lids from Amazon and use those on the buckets. They easily hold 25 lbs of grain. Note that some of the gamma lid rings cracked but the lids still seems to be well sealed. 

2. I store them in my basement where the temp is 68-70 F. 

3. I have been fortunate in the past to receive grain that is bug free but I am not so sure with my last shipment. I found a couple of bugs in the container where I keep left over bran. When I googled, they didn’t look like any bugs that usually reside in grain but to be sure, I am going to freeze all my grains by placing them outside for the next couple of days. The temp is supposed to go to -30 C which is -22 F. 

I bake 12 loaves of about a pound and a half most weekends. My stash of Kamut, Rye, Spelt, Einkorn and two varieties of wheat lasted me a year. This year I added durum and buckwheat to my order. I also store flour in those same 5 gallon bucket since I found an unbleached flour that I like for a third less in price than my old flour. This particular flour also comes in 25 lb bags. 

Hope this helps. 

Justanoldguy's picture
Justanoldguy

What Danni said, 5gal buckets and gamma lids at least for grains I'll be accessing regularly. If I'm looking to store a supply of grain that won't be accessed for some time the standard lid for the buckets will work well. Be aware that once in place, a Gamma lid is there to stay unlike the standard pail lid. Speaking of which, if you use regular lids be sure you have a tool to help you take them off. Both types of lids will seal air and water tight. For long term undisturbed storage I insert an Oxygen absorber of the appropriate size from this company https://packfreshusa.com/. 

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

https://www.bayteccontainers.com has a variety of sizes and shapes, with discounts on multiples.  Before I bought mine I signed on the website and got a discount on my order.  5 full gallons are hard for me to handle, so I got 3.5 gallon  with  LifeLatch lids (same as on Breadtopia).  They are very easy for my arthritic thumbs to open/close. 

netfan's picture
netfan

Thank you for your responses!  Do you all get your grains directly from the "basement buckets" each time you mix dough, or do you keep smaller containers at the ready closer to where you mill and mix?  I am thinking about a set of "lock and lock" containers to keep smaller amounts that would last for several bakes that could be resupplied from the larger storage containers every other week or so... is there merit to that thought?

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I don’t have room in my kitchen for smaller containers and the exercise is good. 😉

Justanoldguy's picture
Justanoldguy

I have a bunch of old fashioned Ball and Atlas glass-lidded, bail canning jars including three 1/2gal 'Jumbo' jars. They each hold enough grain for at least three bakes. I found a source for the rubber rings that seal them and the big jars hold grains for my weekly bake - hard red and white wheats - and breakfast porridges - oat groats. The quart jars hold grains that I use in smaller quantities - rye and sprouted wheats. They have a small enough 'footprint' to occupy minimal space on the counter and they reveal the quantities remaining readily and are in easy reach of my scale and mill. Storage for replenishing them is only a few steps away in my kitchen pantry.

prpltrmpt's picture
prpltrmpt

I went to my local Kroger and asked the employees in the bakery section for used frosting containers that they were about to throw out. They are a pain to clean out thoroughly, but they are free, airtight, come with a handle and at least 2-3 gallons in capacity! Hope your local grocery store does the same.