The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

100% white flour and fools crumb

solano's picture
solano

100% white flour and fools crumb

Long time since I shared my breads here, was trying to read more than bake, trying to understand the dough at each stage of the prepare. The temperature here has increased a lot, my kitchen is always at 28-32 celsius degrees, day or night. The main problem I am having with my doughs are in shaping, it has been so hard to shape lately, sometimes the dough feels nice at the BF, holding shape nicely after the coil folds, but when I try to shape it become loosely, air escaping on the sides and cant hold the shape anymore. It is very difficult to move the dough to the banneton, but I do and when I bake it will turn in a disc, but well fermented bread because of the long retard at the refrigerator. Well, I'm reading Trevor's book, and seems like under fermentation is my problem. My starter is ok, my levain get ready in nice time, so I am not pushing BF enough or maybe I am unable to develop the dough structure with strenght. I need to read more, for sure. But yesterday I had a better result, it's clearly to me that this is a case of "fools crumb", still better than what I was having. Now let's get to what matters, how I did the bread of the pictures. Levain was build from 6g of starter, 3 feeds 1-1-1, 100% hydration. 1000g final dough, 68% final hydration, 2% salt, 10% levain. It's 100% white flour. I did a premix (flour, water and salt) at 6 am and put it in the refrigerator. At 1 pm I removed and let it rest on the counter. At 5:15 pm I added the levain, mixed very slowly to not break the gluten that was developed at the premix and started the coil folds. As the dough was holding shape already, I did folds with 1 hour interval aproximately, when the dough spreaded enough. At 10:40 pm it seemed the dough was fine, some bubbles on the surface, not sticking a lot and holding shape for longer time. Here I changed my plans, usualy I turn the dough on the counter and pre-shape using my bench knife and turning the dough in to a boule, but I decided to remove and pre-shape at the sametime using the coil folds. I put the dough on the counter and it holded shape nicely, 20 minutes and it almost not spreaded, so I decided I was not going to shape anymore, I just used the bench knife to try to create some tension scraping the dough on the sides and moved it to the banneton and to the refrigerator. At 8 pm of the next day I removed it to bake, it standed tall and firm after removing from the banneton in to the pan, it was really easy to cut. Baked for 20 minutes with lid, 25 without it, all at 250º C. At the temperatures of my kitchen, a BF of five hours seems more than enough to me, it's hard to believe it was under fermented, but I think I should probably let it BF for more time. 

Comments

Abe's picture
Abe

I'm inclined to think that's more to do with shaping. Apart from a few large air bubbles the rest looks amazing. 

solano's picture
solano

Maybe "coil shaping" is not the best strategy! hahaha

hreik's picture
hreik

loaf of bread.  Really. would love a slice just now.  With butter and cheese.

hester

solano's picture
solano

butter and cheese are my favorite choice with bread!

pmccool's picture
pmccool

The areas surrounding the large bubbles are well-aerated themselves.  Very much what I want to see in a bread, as a matter of fact.  The three or four very large bubbles may not have been deflated during degassing or shaping after the bulk ferment.  

Considering that you are baking with some lower-protein flours, I'd say that you have achieved very good results.  

Paul

solano's picture
solano

Yes, probably the problem was the shaping,  or the absence of shaping, since I just coil folded it. I need to improve my shaping skills. Thank you for your comment.

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

The crumb looks good.  It looks like you made a very deep cut.  I'm not sure why your starter feeds are 1-1-1 instead of 1-2-2 or something, but it's working fine.

solano's picture
solano

i feed my starter at 1-1-1 because I guess it is better to refresh it in 3 turns, and I only bake 1 or 2 breads a time, so I don't need a lot of levain, I have a spreadsheet which calculates the aumount of levain I will need, and calculates how much from the starter I need, so I get usually 6-7g from the starter in the fridge and end up with 130g of levain, after 3 feeds. If I used to feed 1-2-2, the aumount of the starter would be so tiny at the beggining that could difficulty things.