The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Croissant sheeter lamination problem

prcek21's picture
prcek21

Croissant sheeter lamination problem

Hello,

I have completely the same problem like here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/39900/laminated-dough-and-pastry-sheeters  But there is no solution.

Do you know, what is problem or how can I solve it? 

I have tried increase % butter of lamination and 30 minutes resting after book and letter fold and nothing. 

 If I laminate by hand everything is ok in proofing, but if I use sheeter, the top of croissant is wrinkle and It seems like butter cracks inside and have brioche crumb after baking.

thanks for your advices

Lucie

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

The OP on that thread never gave us an update, so I don't know if my post helped or not. Have a look here.

gary

prcek21's picture
prcek21

Hi Gary,

what is your desired thickness?

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

My initial thickness of the encased butter is ¾in (about 8×8in) which I roll to 8×24×¼in. After the letter fold, I'm back to ¾in thick. My final roll-out is to ⅛in thick, from which I cut and shape the croissants.

gary

prcek21's picture
prcek21

I do it almost the same only my final roll out is about 1/7 in (4mm). What is your % of butter for lamination? Do you strech croissants before shaping?

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

My roll-in butter is 25-30% of the dough weight. In the summer, I tend toward the greater proportion and rest more often and longer.

Yes, I stretch before/during the shaping. But, not all that much, maybe a couple of inches (5cm).

Don't take my blathering as canonical.  I make them too seldom to have much confidence in my own abilities.

g

kendalm's picture
kendalm

that I know will cause butter to crack, one is the obvious that being butter temperature is too cold and the other is not pounding it out while still cold before forming your slab. You lam looks great in the photo. What I discovered is if you know your butter (brand) well you can laminate rather aggressively amd not even worry about completely enveloping the slab, it will spread real nicely. Cooincidently I made reference to cracking butter just last week - http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/57916/more-adventures-croissanting

 

 

prcek21's picture
prcek21

Hello,

I have nice layers after lamination without butter cracks, but everything is gone during proofing. Maybe I have too thin butter layers and then crack during proofing. I use 84% french butter President.

kendalm's picture
kendalm

So your problem is that the final interior looks like there are no layers is that right ? Maybe you are proofing too warm and letting the butter melt. President is my favorite it's the perfect butter for this but if you proof too warm everything will merge together.  if you use half butter by flour weight you should have plenty of separation and judging by the photo it looks really good.  for the record proof around 72f or even lower for a longer time - you can final proof around 2 hours at below 70f (maybe I'm wrong bit just taking a stab)

prcek21's picture
prcek21

Yes, final interior is without layers, like brioche. I use 29% butter for lamination, I think it is enough, but during proofing my layers crack and croissant is wrinkle like photo. I proof around 77-78f  and 75-80% RH for 3 hours. I'll try lower degree, maybe it helps.

Thank you for your advices :-)