The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Black Rice Porridge Bread

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Black Rice Porridge Bread

This bread is based on Chad Robertson's Tartine 3 brown rice porridge bread.  As Robertson says, "...combine well-cooked whole grain rice with a highly hydrated whole wheat dough and let the loaves fully ferment with natural leaven to make the nutrients contained within the finished bread readily available for digestion."  I opted to use organic black rice for its rich nutritional value and cut back on the total amount added to the dough to keep the bread a bit lighter; I also added a small amount of oat porridge for complimentary taste and texture.  The dough was mixed with 200g fresh milled, high extraction organic rye/Marquis wheat flour and 800g organic all purpose white flour autolysed with 750g filtered water for 1 hour; then 15g sea salt, 250g young levain was mixed/50 stretch and folds. After the second of four series of stretch/folds done every 30 minutes, 350g black rice porridge and 50g oat porridge was added. Bulk fermentation was 4 hours at room temperature; then pre-shaped and 1/2 hour rest before final shaping and cold-proofing for 10 hours. Baked covered for 25 minutes at 500 F; 10 minutes at 450 F and then uncovered for 20 minutes at 450 F.  The bread is very soft, chewy with a slight purple colour and a nice nutty, mellow flavour; sesame seeds and the sifted bran coating added an extra bit of flavour to the crust. 

 

 

 

Comments

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

And I love that ear! What a great combo of ingredients! Another one to bookmark!

The weight of the rice and oat porridges are after they were cooked or is that dry weight before water was added?

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Hi Danni,

The weight of the rice and the oat porridge is the cooked weight. After adding the porridge the final dough hydration felt like around 82-85%, the rice porridge was quite wet.

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and delicious looking all around! I've got Tartine 3 on the Kindle as it was really reasonable and must have a closer look......Your loaves  could be photos out of the book! Kat

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Thanks Kat, I think you will enjoy Tartine 3, lots of interesting baking and beautiful photos...l look forward to seeing what you decide to bake first after reading it!

 

DesigningWoman's picture
DesigningWoman

And it sounds so healthy.

Enjoy it!

Carole

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Thank you Carole, it is a nice bread and typical of most porridge breads, is best after 24 hours. The nutritional bonus comes from the black rice porridge but the fresh milled organic grain adds a nice background flavour and healthy benefits too.

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

Another enticing bake.  Nice to see another bake from you CM.  The porridge weight called for in Tartine 3 is unworkable.  I and everyone I know who bakes from these recipes uses much less.

Phil

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

I agree with you Phil...it seems the porridge weight Robertson uses in the Tartine 3 porridge breads makes for a very heavy bread. Have you had an opportunity to try any of the porridge breads from Tartine in San Francisco?  I have not and so don't have any reference point for the texture/crumb/taste of the bread Robertson is baking.  I content myself with baking it as I like, blissfully ignorant maybe of what it should/could be like.  Thanks for your kind comments, hope you're still baking lots of good bread Phil!

 

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

I haven't had their porridge bread, but I regularly get their country loaf whenever I get to SF on the weekend.  Tartine breads are on another level.  There is so much good artisan baking now, we've almost come to take Tartine for granted.  The country loaf has roughly 30% whole grain, apparently, although I don't know the recipe they're using now and how much 85 extraction, WW, or whole grain is used.  It definitely has a dark crumb, as dark as my 50% whole grain bakes.  The crumb is unbelievably open and custardy, with a light, pleasant sourness, and of course the crust is perfect.

I was on a hiatus from baking as I recovered from a bizarre sun rash on my hands (from exposure to limes + sun), but I baked last weekend and will be again this weekend.  I'm going to attempt crackers this weekend.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

when it comes to heavy weightlifting:-)  This one came out very open none the less.  It has to be tasty healthy and nourishing .  Well done and happy baking CM

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Thanks Dab, the bread isn't as heavy as if I had used the full amount of rice porridge, 700g I believe, called for in Robertson's recipe.  Just a personal preference, I like this kind of bread a little lighter and don't think the nutritional composition suffers too much from using half that amount, especially with the use of 20 % fresh milled grains and coating the loaves with the bran and sesame seeds. I am happy with the way it turned out but maybe I will try one with a full addition of rice porridge just to see what a Tartine loaf is all about.  Happy baking Dab!

isand66's picture
isand66

I just posted another version that has some similar ingredients.  I used pink rice instead of black for this one.  Yours looks perfect with a nice open and moist crumb.

Happy Baking.

Ian

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Hi Ian, I just had a look at your pink rice loaves....that's really beautiful, tasty looking bread.  And pink rice makes for a much more appetizing  crumb colour than black rice!  Thanks for having a look at my post, hope all is well and look forward to seeing your next bake!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

I like the way the sesame seeds cover the crust too: very elegant looking :) 

Rice indeed tastes pretty well in bread. I prefer to mill it for optimal flavour and colour like I did in my last bake though keeping it whole adds texture.   

Your bread always looks so delicious that I'm already impatient for your next post!

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Thanks for your kind comments Elsie.  I am pretty conservative when it comes to baking bread and this was a bit of an experiment for me, I am glad it turned out.  You are much more adventurous in your baking - that's something I admire because your breads are often different, unique and more creative than anything I could imagine! But that's why I enjoy this online community, it's good to get out of my own head and see what others are doing, how they see things, how they get to that common goal of a finished baked loaf of bread.  Keep up the interesting baking Elsie, look forward to seeing what you come up with next.