The Fresh Loaf

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I have a question and don't know where to ask it????

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maryb's picture
maryb

I have a question and don't know where to ask it????

Hopefully it's okay to post a question here.  I'm new to the site, you see.  Last night I wanted to make a pizza, using the dough from the master recipe in Jeff's & Zoe's book, and I couldn't get it to flatten out.  Even using my heavy rolling pin, it kept drawing back up.  What can I do to fix that?

crusty1's picture
crusty1

I would stretch or roll it out untill the dough started to pull back. Then cover it and let it rest a few minutes before stretching it some more.

breadnerd's picture
breadnerd

For pizza, I usually sub-divide the dough and round them up, then let them sit for 10 minutes or so while I get the toppings etc. ready to go. And like crusty said, if it is too difficult to work with mid-shaping, just let it rest for a few more minutes and keep going. I also do that with long shapes (pretzels, baguettes)--they sometimes need a rest halfway through shaping to cooperate.

 

 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Maryb,
Your dough was showing you that it had developed gluten and was acting like a rubber band wanting to snap back. The first thing you need to remember is to allow the dough to relax for a few minutes when it starts to pull back. Just cover it loosely for 5 or 10 minutes and let it relax. When you go back to it, be gentle and make your movement count in that you shouldn't be kneading as you stretch. Once you squish into a disk, use your fingers to push out the edges.

There are lots of ways to make pizza dough but in general I find that higher hydration (70-75%) using AP flour gives me the thin crust we like. Never ever use a rolling pin.

Works for me.
Eric

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

try working a little water into it.  Next time save 1/2 cup flour to the very end.  As I understand it, it should be a soft dough.

Mini O

raisdbywolvz's picture
raisdbywolvz

Try pulling outward gently from the edges, particularly from underneath. That works well for me. And like others have said, a short rest is essential, too.