The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Greetings from California

Allison Slattery's picture
Allison Slattery

Greetings from California

Hello!

My name is Allison Slattery and I look forward to learning more about artisan bread baking from this community.  I've been a long time home cook and baker but I have recently (the past three months) become obsessed with bread making.  To date I've made white and wheat loafs, cinnamon rolls, apple bread, cinnamon raisin bread, ciabatta, English muffins, marble rye, bagels, pretzels, hamburger buns,  French bread, crumpets, and yesterday a chocolate babka.  I began a sourdough starter a few days ago (10/6/2018) so I am still waiting to begin using a natural starter in my breads.  We also homebrew quite frequently so I'd like to start using the spent grains in some breads.  Definitely something I need to research! 

Southbay's picture
Southbay

If that pic is any indication, you'll soon be turning out some nice sourdough breads. 

Southbay's picture
Southbay

If that pic is any indication, you'll soon be turning out some nice sourdough breads. 

Allison Slattery's picture
Allison Slattery

I think I'm going to try the yeasted version of the Community Bake recipe since my starter isn't ready yet.

littlelisa's picture
littlelisa

Hi Alison, I'm sure you'll find tons of inspiration around here. That babke looks fantastic. Breadmaking is indeed obsession-forming :-) One piece of advice I've found invaluable (and something you may find happens intuitively as you get to grips with sourdough) is to choose one bread, and make that one over and over til you get a feel for it. If you're doing things like crumpets, waffles and pancakes, you may find those useful for the leftover/discard of your starter as you cultivate it. Happy baking!!

Allison Slattery's picture
Allison Slattery

I'm going to try the yeasted version of the Community Bake recipe to start and see how it goes! :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and sit back for hours of reading, formulas and ideas for all kinds of bread.   Not many folks here bake much yeast bread after baking with SD.  You can also bake with natural yeast water cultivated from fruits and not ever have to use commercial yeast again when you want a bread that isn't sour or you want to tone down the sour in a SD bread.  Just type yeast water or YW in the sherch box

Welcome and Happy baking  

Allison Slattery's picture
Allison Slattery

Looking forward to this research.  We brew 12 gallon batches so we have A LOT of spent grains left after a brew day.  Luckily we have neighborhood chicken coops that love the stuff.  I'm not sure I could make that much bread! :)  I'm also curious about how the different beer yeast strains we use might play into baking.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

That's a beautiful babka, Allison!

Looking forward to seeing your other baking.

Happy baking!

David

Allison Slattery's picture
Allison Slattery

Thanks David!  This looks like a great place for inspiration and advice!