The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Honey Spelt and Oats with Ancient Grains

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Honey Spelt and Oats with Ancient Grains

 This won’t be much of a write up because I used the same recipe and method as my last bake except for the following:

1. I used Roger’s Oats with Ancient Grains instead of plain large flake oats. 

2. I added all of the water at the beginning which made for easier mixing. 

3. I threw in an extra fold but kept the total fermentation time at 3 hours and 45 minutes. 

4. I retarded the loaves for only 8 -9 hours and baked directly out of the fridge. 

5. I tried baking for 30 minutes with the lid on and 17 minutes with the lid off. 

The last one is because I feel that sometimes the loaves seem to lose some height when I switch the pots from top rack to bottom rack and vice versa when baking 6 loaves at once. I thought that maybe baking a tad longer with the cover on would strengthen the structure of the loaf so they would be more able to handle the move. Seemed to have worked as they came out just gorgeous!

Once again, I am really happy with what is coming out of the oven. I was definitely over bulking and over proofing my loaves! 

Comments

solano's picture
solano

Gorgeous breads!

I have some questions for you, if you do not mind.

How do you make those cuts that do not seem to follow a pattern?

In the previous post I was going to ask and forgot, you said you froze some breads, could you explain how you do it and how do you do when you want to defrost?

:)

Solano

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

is that I don’t cut at all! When I proof the dough, I make sure that the seam is under the boule when I put it in the banneton. 

Then when I bake, I flip the boule so the seam is up and I place it like that in the pot. The seam is a weak point so the dough tears naturally there. It saves me some time when I am trying to load that many loaves at once into the oven and I really like the look of it. 

As to freezing bread, I simply place the bread, once it is completely cooled, in a ziplock bag, then take out as much air as possible and toss in the freezer. To thaw, I leave the loaf in the bag overnight at Room temperature. It is important to keep the loaf in the bag so that the moisture that came out of the loaf goes back into the loaf. I had a friend who took it out of the bag to thaw, and she ended up with a hunk of very dry bread. 

You can also slice the loaf before freezing. When I do that, I bag the slices in pairs and put them all in a second bag. I thaw the same way as above. 

Hope this helps! 

solano's picture
solano

Thank you for the tips!

:)

isand66's picture
isand66

Another beautiful bake.  Glad to hear you are getting your timing perfected.  Always nice when you see the results from your efforts.

Regards,

Ian

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I had frozen this loaf since we had an abundance of bread when I baked this. We cut into this one tonight. Once again, I am very happy with the crumb!

isand66's picture
isand66

Looks great!

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

your breads just always look so good!

Leslie