The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Spotlight On…Alternate Flour: Einkorn, Buckwheat & Rice

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Spotlight On…Alternate Flour: Einkorn, Buckwheat & Rice

The einkorn used in this bread was given by a friend. To let its flavour shine, I paired it with white whole wheat flour.

40% Einkorn Sourdough

 

Dough flour (all freshly milled):

180g      60%       Whole white wheat flour

120g      40%       Whole einkorn flour

 

For leaven:

10g       3.3%       Starter

25g       8.3%       Bran sifted out from dough flour

25g       8.3%       Water

 

 

For dough:

275g     91.7%     Dough flour excluding bran for leaven

201g       67%      Water

50g      16.7%      Whey

60g         20%      Leaven

9g            3%       Vital Wheat Gluten

5g         1.7%       Salt

 

___________

305g       100%     Whole grain

281g      92.1%     Total hydration

 

Sift out the coarse bran from the dough flour, reserve 25g for leaven. Soak the rest in equal amount of whey taken from dough ingredients.

Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until doubled, about 4 hours.

Roughly combine all dough ingredients except for the salt, leaven and soaked bran, autolyse for 15 minutes. Knead in the reserved ingredients and ferment for 30 minutes. Fold in the add-ins then ferment for 3.5 hours longer.

Preshape the dough then let it rest for 15 minutes. Shape the dough and put in into a banneton. Leave to proof for 20 minutes before retarding for 11 hours.

Preheat the oven at 230°C/446°F.

Score the dough and bake straight from the fridge at 230°C/446°F with steam for 15 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let cool for at least 3 hours before slicing.

Einkorn flour made the dough sticky and I almost failed to release it from the benetton. Despite the stickiness, the dough was manageable and quite elastic with the added gluten. The dough was likely slightly over-proofed, as evidenced by the lack of oven spring. Next time, I would skip the room temperature proof and retard directly after shaping.

This bread is very moist and chewy. As opposed to what some bakers suggested, I do not recognize any bitterness offered by einkorn. It is sweet and malty, with aroma that almost reminds me of coconut.

 

Lemon Black Sesame Sourdough with 30% Buckwheat

 

Dough flour:

210g      70%       Whole red wheat flour

90g        30%       Buckwheat flour

 

For leaven:

10g       3.3%       Starter

10g       3.3%       Bran sifted out from dough flour

10g       3.3%       Water

 

 

For dough:

290g     96.7%       Dough flour excluding bran for leaven

206g     68.7%       Water

59g       19.7%       Whey

30g          10%       Leaven

12g            4%       Alt Altus

9g              3%       Vital Wheat Gluten

5g           1.7%       Salt

1/4 tsp        -%       Lemon zest

 

Soaker:

15g           5%       Black sesame seeds

30g         10%       Water

 

___________

305g        100%     Whole grain

310g     101.6%     Total hydration

 

Sift out the coarse bran from the dough flour, reserve 10g for leaven. Soak the rest in equal amount of whey taken from dough ingredients.

Combine all leaven ingredients and let sit until doubled, about 4 hours.

Toast the black sesame seeds and pour the water over the hot seeds. Set aside until needed.

Roughly combine all dough ingredients except for the salt, leaven, soaked bran and soaker, autolyse for 15 minutes. Knead in the reserved ingredients and ferment for 30 minutes. Fold in the add-ins then ferment for 5 hours longer.

Preshape the dough then let it rest for 15 minutes. Shape the dough and put in into a banneton. Leave to proof for 20 minutes before retarding for 9 hours.

Preheat the oven at 230°C/446°F. Remove the dough from the fridge to warm up at room temperature for 20 minutes. 

Score the dough and bake at 230°C/446°F with steam for 15 minutes then without steam for 25 minutes more or until the internal temperature reaches a minimum of 208°F. Let cool for at least 3 hours before slicing.

The crumb texture is a bit gritty thanks to the buckwheat flour. Though still reasonably moist, I might up the hydration a bit in an attempt to improve it.

This bread is rather bitter tasting without any form of sweetener. It would be better to compliment the unique earthiness of buckwheat with some sprouted flour, or glazed nuts or dried fruits. 

 

Adzuki Bean White Sesame Matcha Swirl Bread

 

Dough flour (all freshly milled):

280g      70%       Whole white wheat flour

120g      30%       Brown rice flour (I used Japanese short grain)

 

For tang zhong:

20g          5%      Whole white wheat flour 

20g          5%      Brown rice flour

200g      50%      Water

20g          5%      Honey

10g       2.5%      Matcha powder

 

For adzuki bean paste:

80g         20%       Dried adzuki beans

320g       80%       Water (1st round)

30g        7.5%       Sugar

100g       25%       Water (2nd round)

1/8 tsp 0.16%       Salt

 

For sesame paste:

75g     18.75%       Toasted white sesame seeds

45g     11.25%       Condensed milk (I used low fat)

25g       6.25%       Smooth peanut butter

20g            5%       Hot water

 

For dough:

360g       90%        Dough flour excluding flour for tang zhong

<269g   <67.25%   All of the tang zhong

100g       25%        Water

50g       12.5%       Whey

9g         2.25%       Vital Wheat Gluten

5g         1.25%       Salt

1/2 tsp  0.44%       Instant yeast  

 

___________

400g          100%      Whole grain

353.4g    88.35%      Total hydration (including tang zhong and honey)

 

Make the tang zhong. Slowly whisk together the flour and water until no lump remains. Cook over medium-low heat until a thick paste is formed. Remove from heat and stir in the matcha powder and honey to dissolve. Let cool to room temperature.

For the adzuki bean paste, pressure cook the adzuki beans with the first part of water for 10 minutes. Let the pressure release naturally. Roughly mash the beans. Pour in the remaining water, sugar and salt, then pressure cook for 5 minutes longer. When all pressure is naturally released, stir through the mixture to mash the beans to desired consistency. Let cool to room temperature.

For the sesame paste, ground the sesame seeds to a coarse texture. Combine the rest of the ingredients then stir in the ground seeds. Set aside until needed.

Roughly combine all dough ingredients and set aside for 20 minutes. Stretch and fold the dough for a few times gently. Let ferment for an hour or until doubled in size. Divide the dough into two equal portions and roll into two rectangles of the same size. Spread the sesame paste onto one piece of dough and the adzuki paste onto another. Put the one with adzuki paste on top of the other. Pinch them together and roll into a log. Cut it crosswise into 4 equal pieces. Place them into a prepared pan with the cut sides facing the long side planes of the pan. Let proof for 20 minutes at room temperature before retarding for 10 hours.

Bake at 180°C/356°F for 50 minutes or until the bread reaches 185°F. Let cool for 1 hour before slicing.

This sweet, moist and soft bread is made for babka lovers. Both the sesame paste and adzuki paste are sweet but no overly so. The recipe for the sesame paste follows loosely of that of the filling for Chinese sesame buns麻蓉包. It was left rough and lumpy to provide some texture to this bread. As matcha and adzuki paste belong to Japanese cuisine, this bread is a fusion between Chinese and Japanese.

______

Corn man tao

Dabrownman’s Chili Verde. Thanks again for the recipe. My family loved it!

Smoked salmon kedgeree

Barley risotto with garlicky shrimp and summer veggies

 

Sorry for the long post!

 

Comments

PalwithnoovenP's picture
PalwithnoovenP

I'm not a big whole grain guy but I'm a big sweets guy so I think the azuki sesame bread is a great compromise and I will surely enjoy it. 紅豆沙 is Chinese but it also uses azuki beans, am I correct? 紅豆沙 and anko are both delicious but each has its own distinct use and taste. I love them both! You are full of ideas from flavors to textures and now for shaping techniques. Thank you for letting us be a part of your world.

The bread reminds me of a crepe that I filled with red beans. I think you would also like the Korean bukkkumi as it is a unique rice cake with a red bean (or really any other) filling.

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

and so yes, 紅豆沙 uses adzuki beans as well. However, it is a sweet soup eaten on its own and is cooked with rock sugar and some kind of dried citrus peel. On the other hand, anko is a thicker and usually sweeter paste made with white sugar and adzuki beans only, it's often used in (e.g. as a filling) or served with desserts. There is in fact a similar adzuki paste 紅豆沙餡 in Chinese cuisine but the common practice is mixing oil into cooked paste to make it smoother and more aromatic.

I have not had bukkkumi before. Nevertheless, considering my love for Chinese 豆沙鍋餅 and 香蕉豆沙糕, and Japanese Dorayaki and Daifuku, I most love that chewy-crispy rice cake as well!

Thanks for your kind words! They're strong motivations for me in creating new recipes.

PalwithnoovenP's picture
PalwithnoovenP

What I meant was 紅豆沙餡 as the bean paste that I also love. I 豆沙 means bean paste so I though 紅豆沙 will refer to red bean paste but it turns out that it refers to a red bean soup and I am missing another character. I always make a smooth Chinese bean paste for my oriental pastries but I also make anko occasionally. I like bean pastes made with lard but I can't find any good lard so I just use vegetable oil. 

The 豆沙鍋餅 looks interesting and similar to the Thai banana roti that I made before.

isand66's picture
isand66

And cooking!

Everything looks terrific. Love the moist crumb on the first bake and the Adzuki Bean White Sesame Matcha Swirl Bread looks amazing!  Very creative and it must taste terrific.

To combat the bitterness in the buckwheat bread you can try using a longer autolyse and add a little honey.  The crumb looks perfect though and I'm sure this one would go great paired with some dry wine and some sharp cheese.

Happy Baking!

Ian

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

As a humectant, it can probably moisten the crumb too. Killing two birds with one stone :) Any bread would taste good with some cheese on top, no doubt about it.

I'm glad you like the post. The einkorn bread and sweet swirl bread do taste nice. Too bad there's just a few slices left. 

Happy Baking!

texasbakerdad's picture
texasbakerdad

That yellow rice, salmon, and egg plate looks delish! And the chile verde, YES! I have been looking for new ways to use peppers and that chile verde is something I have never made! Thankyou.

Also, your bean/bread swirl, being cloistered in Texas, I have never been exposed to such a thing, I love the idea! I love beans, and I love bread.

Finally, a question. You separate the bran from the flour. Please educate me. I assume you separate the bran so that it does not cut the gluten. I notice you put some of the bran in the leaven, Why? Is the bran added for flavor, does the bran provide nutrient to help the leaven grow, is the moist leaven just as an easy way to soften the bran, or all of the above? or something else?

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Dabrownman is the expert in this area. I'm just using his idea for producing whole grain bread with open crumb. All three points you mentioned are relevant. For the rationale behind, you might want to refer to point 5 of this post. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/43380/lucy%E2%80%99s-favorite-methods-make-healthy-and-beautiful-bread

I'm delighted to know that I can inspire both your baking and cooking :) It's the first I made chile verde as well. Since the instructions given by Dabrownman were clear, the dish was easy to replicate.

Thanks for the comment!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

How to Make Great Whole Grain Sprouted SD Bread post.  What is really odd is that we still do it exactly the same way today.  Lucy hasn't found anything better!

Glad you guys liked the Chili Verde - We do to!  Your breads are really starting to be something special.  Lucy is very proud of you and your bread!  It hast to be healthy, tasty, sour and nutritious, while still being boldly baked on the outside and soft, moist and open on the inside plus they keep well!.  That is what whole grain breads are all about and you have found that out by baking them.  Well done and

Happy baking Elsie!

PS Love all the food and photos of it.  I feel like we are Sympatico Amigos!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Well, perhaps something new will be added but the "old" tips would still apply. I don't bookmark a lot of posts (exactly 20...wait, is that a lot?) but it is one of it. In fact, I have 9 of your blog/ forum posts bookmarked :)

I'm flattered to hear that you're proud of my bread! It feels like getting a pat on the back from one of my much respected teachers. Taste and texture are always what matter most. The crumb has to be soft, moist but chewy at the same time. And the crust being shiny and crispy. The nutritious benefits are only the bonus as it is meaningless to make healthy bread that tastes bitter, bland, dry or dense.

Thanks for the compliment! My passion for cooking seems to have returned suddenly. I wonder if it's stimulated by your mouth-watering dishes?  

Looking forward to your kamut pizza!

 

franbaker's picture
franbaker

point me to your How to Make Great Whole Grain Sprouted SD Bread post? I found it before coffee, lost it, and can't seem to find it again!

Thanks :-)

franbaker's picture
franbaker

to try that einkorn once I've got a bit more experience. (Have two pounds of einkorn berries waiting to be milled.) How well do you think it would go without the vital wheat gluten? I don't mind whole grain breads that are a bit dense, but my other eater is less pleased with them.

Beautiful breads and other foods!

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

were its stickiness and tendency to spread. Nixing the vital wheat gluten means even weaker dough and thus more spreading :) You may either reduce the percentage of einkorn used or lower the hydration, unless you don't mind ending with pancakes... For this bake, I optioned for 80% hydration for the eirkorn flour. Many recommended starting with 65% hydration for whole einkorn flour until you feel comfortable working with it. My dough felt firm after mixing but loosened up after the bulk. It turned significantly stickier so if your dough is wet right at the beginning, it is very likely that it would lose its shape and collapse after the bulk. 

Thanks for the compliment!