The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Durum Sweet Potato Bread

isand66's picture
isand66

Durum Sweet Potato Bread

This is a pretty simple bread made with 55% fresh milled and sifted Durum flour along with a little fresh milled whole wheat and KAF French style flour.  The Instant Pot yogurt was added to soften the crumb and roasted sweet potatoes add some extra tenderness and flavor.

This was a very tasty bread, perfect grilled with some melted cheese brushed with a good olive oil.

 

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.   You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours  and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, yogurt, sweet potatoes and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 525 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Comments

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

I'm guessing the mashed potatoes/ sweet potatoes acts like porridge in dough, so I think one should drop the hydration by 3-5% with its inclusion? I plan to incorporate mashed beans into a formula and it'd likely act like mashed potatoes.

The brownish orange crumb looks super moist and sweet! And I like the colour contrast between the orange crust and black sesame seeds. 

Your garden is brimmed with blossoming flowers! I love how the purple/ blue flowers at the bottom give a pop of coolness in the flaming garden.

Thanks for the lovely post! 

isand66's picture
isand66

Appreciate your kind words.  Yes, the sweet potatoes contain around 58% water (I have to check my chart at home to make sure), so I would use that as a start and adjust your liquids as needed.  Beans are more fibrous so probably don't add as much water as sweet potatoes or regular potatoes.

Glad you like the flowers...we found some real interesting new varieties to plant this year and redid several beds around the yard.  So far so good. 

Regards, and Happy Baking!

Ian

PalwithnoovenP's picture
PalwithnoovenP

Love the look of the long loaf more. Maybe because of the black sesame seeds. Crumb looks so soft and moist. I know I will love this one and I want to try sweet potatoes in bread too. Did you peel them before roasting? How did you prepare them?

Lots of beautiful flowers again. I hope to see peonies blooming again in your garden.

isand66's picture
isand66

I do not peel them.  I roast them on the grill in the summer and then take scoop them out of the shell.  They are super sweet this way from roasting versus peeling and boiling which you loose that extra sugar from the potatoes roasting away.

Glad you like the flowers.  The peonies are all done by now unfortunately.  I didn't get too many photos this year of them.  We just planted a new one that will bloom next summer, so have some time to wait :).  We just planted some new hydrangeas that we found at a nursery that are real cool looking.  Will post a photo next time.

I hope you try this or something similar and let me know how it turns out.

Happy Baking!

Ian

Ru007's picture
Ru007

The crumb looks lovely and soft, I'm sure it was delicious! The flowers are stunning by the way. 

Your starter lives in the fridge right? I ask because your recipes tend to have one feeding to make the levain, do you ever find your starter is a bit sluggish with just one build? 

Anyway, very nice write up.

Happy baking! 

Ru

isand66's picture
isand66

Appreciate your kind words and glad you like the bake and the flowers.  My wife and I spend a lot of time and money and sweat on our gardens and it's nice to hear someone appreciate it.

My starter does reside in my fridge.  I usually refresh it every couple to three weeks which seems to be more than enough keep it active so i don't need to do multiple builds usually.  If I see the levain I'm making is not acting very lively I will do a second build to make sure it's strong enough.  I started adding the left-over bran from milling whole wheat or rye into the mother starter and into the new levains I build and it almost acts like a shot of adrenaline :).

Look forward to your next bake, or if I missed your post I will try and get caught up soon :).

Regards,
Ian

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Love the fancy scoring and ong bread shaping.  The cone flowers are in full swing now and they are beautiful.  B-Great crumb perfect for sandwiches but I think I like the color of the crust the best.

It has been raining 3 daus=ys in a row in the sfternoon since monsoon finalluy started - It's like being in New Orleans with rain at 2 PM every day so i made gunbo tonight for dinner.  Chicken , andouille and shrimp woth chicken and shrimp stock. lovely roux with Tamarind and NO hot sauce and perfect gumbo seasoning with gunbo file.  It is one fo the best in a long time the daughter is in heaven.

Well done and happy baking Ian.  Lucy msses her EC pack.

isand66's picture
isand66

I'll trade you some of this bread to eat with your ridiculous sounding New Orleans food :).

Glad you like the bread and gardens.  The summer flowers are out in force now and the tomatoes and cucumbers are looking good so far...fingers crossed, as last year they started out the same and all went to pot soon after.

Max and Lexi are out back tormenting a squirrel right now but say they will get a good bark in for their West Coast sister Lucy :>.

Happy Baking!

Ian

nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

Sweet potatoes are such a good addition - color, fiber, sweetness. The contrast of dark tiger-stripes of seeds make your loaf look so exotic. Special enough to match the garden!

Cathy

isand66's picture
isand66

Glad you like th3e bake and the gardens.

When are we going to see some of your beautiful gardens?

Happy Baking and Gardening!

Ian

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Is such a treat, wish mine look so nice, too.  We haven't had much time tending our garden, so it's just basic maintenance to keep 🌿🌳🌱 alive😅.  The passion fruit we uprooted surprisingly returned, looking stronger and healthier than ever.  It must be a sign that I should commit to take care of it this time.  I hope I will have home-grown passion fruits soon. 

Your breads look nice and soft. I'm sure they are very tasty, too!  Could you share how to create the specific sesame patterns? And how do you determine when your dough is ready to bake? Thanks!

Happy Baking, Ian!

Yippee 

isand66's picture
isand66

Glad yiu like the gardens and the bread.  To get the pattern I used bannetons for both loaves.  For the baguette I sprinkled the sesame seeds on the bottom of the basket before placing the dough inside the banneton.  When ready to bake after flipping the dough onto parchment paper I scored the dough and baked.  I hope that is clear.  Let me know if you have any other questions.

Happy Baking!

Regards,

Ian