The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

can anyone tell me what the chocolate malted grain is?

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

can anyone tell me what the chocolate malted grain is?

on left of photo is pearled barley and on the right whole wheat berries. local whole food/indian spice shop has it labelled as choc. malted grain but they don’t know which grain. . The recipe I am thinking of making uses chocolate malted kibbled rye which I can’t get. I thought I would run these grains thru my mill on very coarse setting to get a cracked grain. would it matter if it isn’t rye?

Given that this was in brewing section, I am leaning towards it being barley but would like some other opinions please.

Leslie

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

is rye.

Does this look the same to you?

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I had discounted rye because these grains/berries seem much plumper than rye berries, but maybe the malting process plumps them up.  it is pretty cool if it is rye... 😊😊😊

thanks Abe

Leslie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

rye.I'd say it is a 90% chance of being barley and a 10% chance it is wheat.  Rye whiskey makers rarely if ever use chocolate rye. Can't make Porter or stout without chocolate malted barley though which is what it is mainly used foe. No matter which of the 3 it is, it probably doesn't make much difference in your recipe.

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)
dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Still it isn't used much compared to barley and wheat but it is use by a lot of folks in small amounts for craft brews.

Guinness stout is made from water, barley, roast malt extract, hops, and brewer's yeast. A portion of the barley is roasted to give Guinness its dark colour and characteristic taste. It is pasteurised and filtered.  Porter is a dark style of beer developed in London from well-hopped beers made from brown malt. The name was first recorded in the 18th century, and is thought to come from its popularity with street and river porters. The history and development of stout and porter are intertwined.

 

Alex Bois's picture
Alex Bois

and way too plump to be rye, so it is most likely chocolate wheat.

 

Choc. malted barley, rye, and wheat are all very common.

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I am still a bit at sea over this but I doubt it matters.  The local shop didn't know and the dough won't either.  The chocolate malted kibbled "rye" is for a Rugbrod recipe so I will try it and see how it goes.  Just have to figure just how coarse I can grind with my mockmill.  I suspect it will grind finer than commercial kibbled rye but at the end of the day that may not matter, time will tell. I will post my bread once I have made the attempt, a first for me.

thanks

Leslie

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

i think you can grind as fine as you want to without worrying about getting it too warm.  I'd go fine so it blends better.

To answer the Q: can anyone tell me what the chocolate malted grain is?

...the middle stripe in a proposed flag for TFL!    :)

Ru007's picture
Ru007

And what a nice looked flag this would be!! 

 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

thanks Ru

Leslie

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I did a small trial and thought the flour was finer than expected with only a few bigger bits. I will reread the booklet but not stress too much, it is what it is.

I love the idea of a grain flag! lol you are not far off the mark, it does look a bit like that!,

happy baking Mini

Leslie

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

Good morning Abe, 

 Thanks for reaching out to the Oldways Whole Grains Council. We’re a non-profit nutrition education organization, so while we are very familiar with various types of grains and their health benefits, we’re not crop scientists. That said, based on shape alone my best guess would be that this is a variety of either barley or wheat (possibly farro or spelt?). An agricultural expert may be able to give you a more precise guess — we recommend reaching out to a local grain farmer or to the Agriculture Department at a nearby university.  Best,
leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

Abe, you are a treasure! thank you for doing that!  It is highly unlikely to be spelt or farro here so I think I will  go with their suggestion that it is most likely to be barley. I had to buy 500 g but as she couldn’t tell me what grain it was, I got it half price lol so will have to find ways to use it.  I will have to be inventive, so my grain breads will probably have some in them for a while.  and hopefully my rugbrod will turn out yummy!

thank you again my friend

Leslie

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

Malted barley used in brewing comes in many forms.  One form is roasted, which contributes flavors and color from varying levels of caramelization.

Crystal malt is lightly roasted and known for contributing a sweet, rich flavor.  A low proportion of it is present in most of the recipes I used as a brewer.  Black malt is roasted to the essentially burnt stage, and contributes a rich dark color and pleasantly bitter coffee flavor, used in stouts and porters.  Chocolate malt is roasted to brownness, as shown in your photo, and is somewhere in between crystal and black.  It is essential in porters.

As for use in baking, I would think it would be an excellent experiment for rye or even wheat breads, if ground to powder or coarsely milled and made into a soaker.  I look forward to seeing your results.  

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

“solstice challeng - maybe”. It contributed a lot to a really dark almost black crumb and in the quantities I used it is very bitter and your description hits the nail on the head.  I think the recipe just had too much.  I will use a lot in in any future bakes.

thanks Filomatic for the info, 

Leslie