The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

sweet potato substitution for flour and liquid

metropical's picture
metropical

sweet potato substitution for flour and liquid

has anyone any insight for substituting a baked sweet po or 2 for part of the flour and liquid in a multigrain bread?
Not looking to make a savory bread, more a different kind of sandwich loaf.

Portus's picture
Portus

... a.k.a. Madeiran sweet potato bread, I am sure you will find some ideas how to go about incorporating sweet potatoes into a multigrain bread recipe.

Tortoise Blue's picture
Tortoise Blue

Hey Metropical,

I often put mashed yams as well as mashed potatoes into my breads. I just baked up a 40% Red Fife with yams a few weeks back. I'll attach my formula to give you an idea of the ratios. The bread was outstanding. Very moist and the fenugreek leaves give gave it an almost maple syrup flavour.

(I'm not sure how to insert a spreadsheet so I converted it to a jpg. PM me if you want me to email you the actual spreadsheet. I put all of my formulas in Google Sheets in order to scale them as well as keep track of my baking adventures)

Tortoise

 

metropical's picture
metropical

hi Tortoise,

Hadn't heard of Anson Mills before.  Red Fife and a few others look interesting.
First time I've seen methi leaves in bread.  Just had chicken with methi last night.

Others here have linked to their gsheet.  But I can read just fine.  Looks like I have some room to experiment with yams.  Thanks, Fritz.

Portus's picture
Portus

Substituting sweet potatoes for flour got me thinking about the water content of potatoes (some 80%), and how this would impact the overall hydration of a recipe that included unmodified potatoes as an ingredient.  I should have left well alone as my enquiry lead me to read about “the potato paradox”. Thanks to Wikipedia, it is frustratingly explained as follows:

Fred brings home 100 pounds of potatoes, which (being purely mathematical potatoes) consist of 99 percent water. He then leaves them outside overnight so that they consist of 98 percent water. What is their new weight? The surprising answer is 50 pounds. 

It is at this stage that I appreciate learning from the experience of others!

Tortoise Blue's picture
Tortoise Blue

Hey Fritz,

Here is a link to my formula. I find the spreadsheet format very useful in my baking adventures for devising new ideas and re-scaling batches. Feel free to copy and use for your own use.

Tortoise

metropical's picture
metropical

cool.  thanks very Tortoise.

Tortoise Blue's picture
Tortoise Blue

Hey Fritz,

Here is a link to my formula. I find the spreadsheet format very useful in my baking adventures for devising new ideas and re-scaling batches. Feel free to copy and use for your own use.

Tortoise

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

all the time,  I think roasted ones are best for flavor and they have a bit less water. You can search potato on this site and see a ton of recipes At a rule of thumb you can use 60% water for baked potato but it is always wise to hold back some of the water to see how the dough feels first before adding in the rest of the water.

Can't make potato rolls without them either:-)

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I make sweet potato buns (rolls) for Thanksgiving, and find that it is better to roast them then put them through a food mill. They are less 'wet' than if you boil and mash them that way. I don't really calculate the substitution for flour and water but just add the mashed potato to the dough then correct the hydration if required. They make for a very tasty and tender bread.

metropical's picture
metropical

I was definitely thinking roasted for the flavor.

Tortoise Blue's picture
Tortoise Blue

Roasting is the way to go for sure.I just scrub the outside of the yams under water, poke holes all over with a fork and bake on a foil cover pan at 400F for 2 1/2 hours. The caramelization after such a long bake is incredible. The yams come out so sweet.Do give it a go and let me know of your outcome.