The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Proofing

dasadler's picture
dasadler

Proofing

In many (most) bread instructions we are told when proofing to cover the dough with a clear plastic wrap then cover with a kitchen towel (sometimes dry and sometimes wet and warm).  I have even seen instructions to create a proofing box by microwaving a cup of water for a minute, moving the cup of water to a back corner of the microwave then putting the bread pan in the microwave - cover it with a towel - and leave it until doubled in size.

 

My questions is... what is the purpose of covering the dough?  Is it to create a dark environment? protect the dough from contamination while rising?  and why a plastic wrap then a towel? and in the case of the microwave proofing box, I presume the purpose of microwaving the water is to create a warm, wet environment and yet covering the dough with a towel protects the dough from the warm moisture.

Can anyone help me understand this?

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

The reason for covering the dough is to prevent it from drying out.

The idea do the microwave is based on warmth and humidity. You warm the water before putting in the dough. The add the dough in the microwave with the cup of warm water. You would not turn on the microwave while your dough is proofing inside. It serves as an enclosed cabinet during proofing.

Dan

dasadler's picture
dasadler

I appreciate the quick response.  I know the microwave would not be turned on. I should have stipulated that in my post.