The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sift and scald

Beatrice's picture
Beatrice

Sift and scald

Hi bakers!

Today I want to share with you my first experience with a loaf made with the "sift and scald" method; here it is the recipe:

150gr whole wheat flour (you have to sift it 12 hours before starting to mix the other ingredients, the bran that remains has to be soaked in 75gr of scalding water 12 hours)

350gr white bread flour

350gr water

10gr salt

100gr leaven (I made mine with 20gr starter, 40gr white bread flour and 40gr water and let it sit overnight)

 

I prepared the soaked bran the night before and in the morning I mixed water and leaven, than flour (both the white and the sifted one)
and let it sit covered for 1 hour.

I added salt and the soaked bran and worked the dough until all the ingredients were well incorporated; I let it sit for 3 hours and an half for the bulk fermentation and did 4 round of stretch and folds (as this dough was really wet).

Than I let it rise until it nearly doubled in volume, and I started the preshape. I let it rest on the bench for 20 minutes after the reshape and than shaped in a boule shape.

I put the dough in a proving basket and let it sit at room temperature covered for 1 hour and an half.

I then transferred the dough in the fridge for the retarded fermentation until the next morning (circa 18 hours).

I baked it with my Lodge: 20 minutes covered and 35 minutes without the lid.

I am happy with the result and the crumb but I have to admit that it was very difficult to work with and that the oven spring didn't happen. I think that maybe my bran was less dry than I thought (or it was less in quantity) and I added too much water to it, and than this amount of water (350 for the dough and 75 for the bran) was too much to handle properly (as I am a beginner). 

Let me know if you had some experience with this method or if you try my formula!

Keep baking,

Beatrice

Comments

bikeprof's picture
bikeprof

That is a fine looking loaf.

It looks a tad over-proofed is all, and may not have been shaped as tightly as it could have been.  Both of those (possible) factors would help to get a better profile and spring (lower hydration might help you out on that front of course)...but that is nit pickin'...nice work...

Beatrice's picture
Beatrice

You're right, the fact that the dough was so wet was a obstacle at a good shaping action! Also the fermentation, would you consider to do less hours in the fridge or less time at room temperature?

Thanks a lot for your feedback :)

 

bikeprof's picture
bikeprof

I would first try getting it into the fridge earlier in the process (and not going strictly by time on that, but by how fully proofed the dough is...which takes some practice)...

Beatrice's picture
Beatrice

When I'll bake the next loaf, I'll try with your suggestion! 

bikeprof's picture
bikeprof

Further...I think you'd want to compare the sift and scald method with a long autolyse (3hrs+) using equivalent flours, which also seeks to make sure you have proper absorption and softening of the bran. 

I like the sift and scald idea...but know it is a decent amount of extra work.

But if you are into sifting...I also like using the sifted flour in the dough, then using the bran as a coating for each loaf...a popular strategy for using the entire grain without having the bran interfere with loaf volume/texture...

Beatrice's picture
Beatrice

I tried this method only because I was curious to do so, but I'm not sure it gives my favorite kind of loaf (I really appreciate a good toasted oats loaf).

Good idea to put the bran as a coating, I'll give it a try for sure!

Thanks a lot for your feedback ;)