The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Understanding Spanish flour types

Brottagebuch's picture
Brottagebuch

Understanding Spanish flour types

Hi everybody!

I‘m from Germany and want to try some recipes from the Spanish book Pan de Pueblo by Iban Yarza. So I have to substitute Spanish flour with German flour. In the book different names and/or numbers are used. I already found out, that the names and numbers used in the book (i.e. panificable W180) refer to gluten or protein in common (I’m not 100 percent sure about that). The question I’m after is, if the ash content is the same for most of these flours (like harina panificable, harina de media fuerza and harina de fuerza) or if the ash content in harina de fuerza is higher then in harina panificable.

I would be really happy if someone could help me with that. Thanks!

Christoph

Abelbreadgallery's picture
Abelbreadgallery

All these flours are white flours. I am a spanish baker. By the way Iban Yarza is a friend of mine. Harina panificable is All purpose flour. Harina de fuerza is Strong Flour (13 gr of protein or more). Harina de media fuerza is something in between, similar to french T55. You can mix 50% of AP Flour with 50% Strong flour and you get an Harina de media fuerza.

Brottagebuch's picture
Brottagebuch

Thank you! If you say white flours, is it all around the same ash content/extraction rate or are some of the flours whiter than others? I ask this, because German flour is classified by the ash content, not by protein. If I understand you right, I think I have to look for the protein content of the German 550 flours, which seem to be similar to what is white flour in Spain.

Iban Yarza already helped me with a question about masa madre on Twitter. But I did not want to go on his nerves with to many questions. ;)

Abelbreadgallery's picture
Abelbreadgallery

Spain is a country is white bread. If you take a look at the pages of that book, you will notice. There's not a culture of whole cereal bread. Maybe in some areas of Galicia, Catalonia or Mallorca are the excepction. Usually in Spain there are two criterium to classify flour: the first one, the quantity of proteine (from 9gr to 10,5-11 gr of protein is Harina panadera, from 10.5-11 to 13 gr is harina de media fuerza and between 13 to 15 is harina de fuerza). The second classificacion is the ratio  P/L, which defines the balance of the flour (equilibrium between attributes like tenacity, extensibility, elasticity). I hope this info is valid for you.

Brottagebuch's picture
Brottagebuch

Thanks a lot! That’s the information I was looking for. So I will do it like i wrote before. I was not sure if I interpreted the pictures in the book right. I also remember the breads, when I visited friends in Spain in my youth as white breads. But I did not trust myself. 

(And sorry for the bold font in the upper post.)

miroslavw's picture
miroslavw

Hello! Do you recommend any recipes for home bakers to get that lovely fluffy crusty texture for flautas/baguettes? I just came home from Barcelona with some 100% Iberico Ballotes jamon and would love to try and replicate the sandwiches. 

gracias de antemano

Abelbreadgallery's picture
Abelbreadgallery

Most of these are made with "harina panadera". It's the spanish version of french T65 flour, more or less. Less protein than an american bread flour. Mix cake flour and bread flour until you get a 10.5 to 11.5 proteine flour.

See you.