The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Shao Bing

Anne-Marie B's picture
Anne-Marie B

Shao Bing

Crisp and flaky sesame pockets. I have wanted to try my hand at these for a while. I don't think I had the best recipe and had to improvise a bit.

They came out ok and we enjoyed the nutty taste. And I now have a sesame coated kitchen. 

 

More recipes I found interesting:

https://food52.com/recipes/26083-explosively-layered-sesame-shao-bing

http://hidysabc.com/blog/recipe/taiwanese-shao-bing/

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/hunan-beef-and-peppers-pop-and-sesame-shao-bing-chinese-pita-recipe-1939051

My original recipe here:

https://www.gourmettraveller.com.au/recipes/chefs-recipes/sesame-seed-pocket-pita-bread-with-chicken-7242

 

Comments

clazar123's picture
clazar123

They look tasty and so flaky! How is that achieved?

Anne-Marie B's picture
Anne-Marie B

The flaky pastry is achieved by combining a hot oil dough/roux and a hot water dough. Much the same way you would use butter when making croissants. Layering the two types of dough, then rolling out, letter folding, rolling out etc. I will add the links to internet in my post above.

isand66's picture
isand66

This looks very tasty.  Can you share the formula and procedure?

Anne-Marie B's picture
Anne-Marie B

I originally used a recipe I found in the library in a Gourmet magazine. It combines a roux made from flour and hot oil and a hot water dough rolled together. That recipe (https://www.gourmettraveller.com.au/recipes/chefs-recipes/sesame-seed-pocket-pita-bread-with-chicken-7242) used too much oil for the amount of flour and was the wrong consistency. I had to go again - would not use more than 50g oil. I have since found a few more recipes which use a slightly different method of making and rolling the pockets and some even use yeast. I have added them to my blog above.