The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Vintage Mill & Mix... grain mill and mixer combo

ricman's picture
ricman

Vintage Mill & Mix... grain mill and mixer combo

My vintage 1970's Mill & Mix. I just mixed up a 8lb batch of 50% wheat bread (white wheat). It had no problem mixing the dough and I don't believe I've even began to test the limits of the mixer, I think the bowl could easily handle a 16lb batch of dough. After 10 minutes of mixing the dough began to clear the sides of the bowl and passed the window pane test. I love vintage kitchen equipment and at over 45 years old it still runs great.

 

Cheers,

Rick

clazar123's picture
clazar123

What a neat tool! That dough looks good! Great windowpane!

So it handles a large amount easily but will it handle a smaller amount-300g-800g? Also, just out of curiosity, does the bottom of the mixing pan have any bumps or protrusions in it or is it smooth?

ricman's picture
ricman

I have not tried a small amount such as 800 grams in the Mill and Mix yet. I have done a 2 loaf batch at around 1800 grams with no issues. I generally use my Kitchenaid for a single loaf amount of dough. The center portion of the Mill and Mix bowl has a very slight circular rise to it. I am also posting a pic of the difference in bowl sizes of the 3 different mixers I own. The largest being the Mill and Mix, middle one is the Ankarsrum and the smallest is Kitchenaid. I will try a small, say around 800 gram loaf next time and see how the Mix and Mix performs.

ricman's picture
ricman

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Thanks to my husband browsing the "Free" section on our local Craig's list this afternoon, 2-1/2 hours afer the ad posted we came home with a free Mill and Mix.  It's in great shape; no mixer, but not needed as I'm still breaking in the Ankarsrum.  A lovely lady in her 70's no longer bakes, was downsizing, and we were the first to call.  I enjoyed discussing the mill and bread-baking with her.  She bought it new when living in Utah, where it was made.    

We stopped by Whole Foods on the way home and bought wheat berries, oat and buckwheat groats to get started.  I'll get some bulk grains when we RV to Utah in May or June.  No the prettiest or most compact of the electric stone grinders, but a free mill is a great way to try grinding my own flour.

Tips from owners of this mill will be appreciated.       

  

 

 

ricman's picture
ricman

You certainly cant beat free. So far I have only ground hard winter wheat in mine. I usually am looking for a very fine flour. I turn on my mill and adjust the grinding stones until they just begin to make contact, it will make a very slight clicking sound and then I back them off a bit and add the wheat berries. Mine produces a very fine flour, that I love to bake with. Like you said not the most compact mill in the world but it sure gets the job done. I love mine, but have a real love for all things vintage from houses, cars to cool kitchen gadgets.

Enjoy,

Rick

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Rick, as you know the instructions are minimal.  Any advice on truly deep-cleaning the milling portion?  There's flour residue of interdeterminate age in places I can't get to.  We've brushed, wiped, and blow-dried as much as possible.  I'd love to blast water through but know I can't.  Will runnng rice or corn through take care of it?  I'm guessing by the seller's age and talking to her son that it hadn't been used for several years.  Otherwise in great shape.  The bowl you show makes my Ankarsrum bowl look small; wish I had one that size.

Do you ever need to sieve, or do you just run through on coarse and then fine depending on the desired fineness?  I'd like to sift out bran to feed starter, and afer reading here am trying to figure out if (and what size(s) sieves to get.  Need to acquire some addtional grain and get going.  I love that yours is sill going strong.  We too love vintage tools - things were made of quality and built to last years ago.  Thanks!  Karen

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of me I can't understand why a mill and mix combo isn't made today?  This is seriously a cool piece of baking history.  Nice!