The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Croissant, Lamination problem - second turn

prcek21's picture
prcek21

Croissant, Lamination problem - second turn

Hello,

I have problem with butter in the second turn of lamination. The butter is whole after first turn, then rests in the fridge 1 hour. And now is my problem. After 1 hour I try  to roll out the dough but the butter in the dough always cracks. Why? I use french butter for lamination President 84%. I don’t use a sheeter.

Is it the butter cold too much? Should I wait for a while before rolling out? I am desperate from the butter cracking.

Thank you for your advices, Lucie

andythebaker's picture
andythebaker

i generally find i can do two turns right away, rest, and then do the third turn.

or

really the main idea is for the dough's gluten to relax between turns, while maintaining (and not necessarily chilling) the butter block's plasticity.  if it's cool enough at room temp, you could try and rest at room temp, or do a combo of refrigeration and resting out.

 

prcek21's picture
prcek21

Thank you for your reply.

What exactly does tight of dough mean? How can I imagine it?

iPat's picture
iPat

Yes, the butter got too cold. 1 hour in the fridge is too long.

Try refrigerating for less time next time. 20-30 minutes is usually sufficient to relax the dough between turns.

prcek21's picture
prcek21

I will try 20-30 minutes. And how can I recognize, that the butter in the dough is ready for rolling out when I take it from fridge?

iPat's picture
iPat

I use a thermometer.

59°F(15°C) is usually a good temperature for rolling.

prcek21's picture
prcek21

Ok. How do you use a thermometer? Do you jab the thermometer in the laminated dough?

iPat's picture
iPat

Yes.

But you won't need to if you refrigerate them for just 20-30 minutes.

ds99303's picture
ds99303

The problem is after just one turn, the layers of butter in the dough are still fairly thick.  When you chill the dough, the butter re-hardens and then cracks when you try to roll it out.  Doing two turns at the start of the lamination process helps because you end up with thnner layers of butter, but the layers of butter are still thick enough to crack if they get too cold and harden too much.  I suggest you follow the advice of not over-chilling the dough.  Also, try rolling the dough as thin as possible when you do the first two turns so the butter is spread out more and isn't as thick.  Of course you don't want to roll it out so thin that the dough is hard to work with or the butter breaks through however.

Thalia0503's picture
Thalia0503

Hi, I can tell you from a lot of laminating and butter testing that president butter is a bit harder to laminate for beginners, try using french. bridel butter if you can it has A softer more pliable consistency, howevever if you can’t I suggest you try to have the dough and butter same consistency, I’m guessing from the cracking that your butter might be colder then the dough therefore it is cracking and bruising in the dough. Try taking out your butter a bit before puting in dough or while rolling out dough to make sure the temp is right, because once it is in the dough you cannot adjust it to the right temperature 

hope you understand some of my points, but mostly practice and practice and practice will get you through it!! 

 

Xoxo 

prcek21's picture
prcek21

The president butter is hard like stone, when I took it from fridge :D I know advice "the dough and butter same consistency" but what exactly does it mean?

What temperature of butter is right for puting in dough?

Thank you, Lucie

iPat's picture
iPat

Generally, the dough should be @ 6°C (43°F) and the butter @ 15°C (59°F) before lamination.

Afterward, 15°C (59°F) I mentioned before is a good compromise.

Thalia0503's picture
Thalia0503

Haha yes I told you I had my share of errors with different butters. For the temperature I do not really measure temp i basically feel the dough and butter at same time with different hands and see if one is softer then oother, sometimes I even like my butter just A BIT softer then my dough to prevent cracking . 

prcek21's picture
prcek21

thank you all so much!!! Finally I made laminated dough without cracking :-)

indiesicle's picture
indiesicle

Your dough and butter consistency are probably the most important factor assuming you're staying around 58ºF-68ºF ish but the initial dough hydration is also an important consideration as well as it is a big determining factor in consistency. With a higher hydration dough the butter tends to crack easier if the butter is too cold during  lock-in/ 1st roll. You may not notice on first roll but after a rest and subsequent 2nd roll it becomes obvious. I found lower hydration doughs are a bit more forgiving (mine are at 54.5% hydration with no fat other than milk solids in the dough). Also if the dough is very cold and the butter is warm it may cease the butter at lock-in causing cracks. Especially if you walk away for a second after lock-in but before 1st roll. Hope this helps.