The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Holy Tangzhong

Mic's picture
Mic

Holy Tangzhong

For all that commented on my Scalded Flour post thanks.  I tried the Tangzhong approach with milk and replaced half of the whole liquid amount with milk.  Holy cow does it make a difference.  First, the rise of wheat bread was crazy.  My wife always gave me crap because my wheat loafs where too small.  In addition to Tangzhong, I made a little more dough then my normal approach assuming the rise would be the same.  First rise went fine, and I shaped into my normal bread loaf pan.  I had a work meeting.  When I got back the dough was overflowing on all four sides... like a dough waterfall.  That was a good laugh. 

After removing some the dough, reshaping and another rise, I made the loaf and some hogey roles.  The bread was soft and will make great sandwich bread.  Thanks again all.

I did have a problem with the dough deflating after I scored it.  Please confirm, that is because it rose to long or to fast.   

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

Glad you found it successful. Sounds like it exceeded all expectations.

A dough deflating when scored is a sure sign of over proofing. The more whole wheat flour in a dough the less it needs to rise when final proofing.

macette's picture
macette

That is a great explanation link...thank you, saved it. 

HansB's picture
HansB

You may not even need to score your Tangzhong bread, I don't.

Mic's picture
Mic

I just read that last night.  It is an "enriched bread" according to this author and doesn't need it.  He also recommended cooking it at 350 instead of 425 for a softer crust.  What do you cook yours at?

JustJoel's picture
JustJoel

If I’m making ciabatta with a Poolish, or pizza with a biga, or a Brioche with long retarded ferments, will tangzhan be of any benefit? I assume that if I were to use one, I’d make it and add it when the preferment is ready to use, then mix it in with the biga, add the rest of the ingredients and proceed? It seems excessive, as the biga and tangzhan together would use up about 55% of the flour!

I once made a tangzhan for a bread hydrated with only milk. When I tried to use the milk, the tangzhan turned into an actual roux; the fats in the milk cooked the flour! Would low-fat milk be better? Or would using water for the hydration and roux, and using milk powder in the dough be an acceptable substitution?

macette's picture
macette

I have recently been making  Hakkoido Tangzhong using Floyds and GrowingStella's recipe from here and was a great success. It makes a beautiful bread almost like a Brioche. It is our favourite bread. Have also used the tangzhong method for my white sandwich loaf with great results.