The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Do you think this still has a chance

RichieRich's picture
RichieRich

Do you think this still has a chance

The is the recipe

https://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2012/06/14/classic-sourdough-bread-time-steps-in-for-added-yeast/

Everything was going fine. I had gotten to the point that I had kneaded the dough and it was resting in a bowl (from 2-5 hours.) It had been resting about 40 minutes when I realized I forgot to add the salt.

So I took the dough out of the bowl put it on a floured counter top and kneaded the salt in to the dough. It's now resting again. Do you think it has a chance?

 

RichieRich

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Bread is very forgiving!

RichieRich's picture
RichieRich

Thanks, good to hear.

RichieRich's picture
RichieRich

OK, they are out of the oven. They don't look bad on the outside except I thought they might be a little taller. They seemed to have flattened out a little but not bad.

 

[/url]

 

[/url]

After they cool I see what crumb looks like.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Are the bottoms as golden brown as the tops?

RichieRich's picture
RichieRich

Here's a bottom & crumb shot.

[/url]

 

[/url]

 

What is you opinion of the crumb? I think it could be better but as an new baker I don't always know what I looking for. Honest opinions are always the best

 

RichieRich

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

From the looks of the shoulders, it didn't flatten out as in overproofing.  A taller loaf? Maybe just a simple shaping issue, no biggie. Nice browning on the bottom too.  Interesting heat pattern.  The crumb is good, even crumb and no wet looking dense areas.  Crumb bubble direction indicates upward expansion in the middle and outward side motion In the shoulders where the crust is lighter.  How does it taste?    

There is the white band around the loaf.  Alu-foil?  Makes me think the oven placement and temps need a tiny bit of tweaking. Looks like the top crust set early.  But...  :)

All in all a pretty good bake.  Congratulations!  

RichieRich's picture
RichieRich

It taste goo to me. I'm the only bread eater in my house and it half gone already. It's late for me, going to bed. I have a couple questions on your comments I'll post tomorrow.

Thanks you're a great help.

 

RichieRich

 

RichieRich's picture
RichieRich

You can tell all that just my looking.

You mentioned  Alu-foil. The bread was baked on a cookie sheet with foil on it and parchment paper on top of that. You can see the foil around the edges in my first picture.  I'm guessing I need to get rid of the foil next time.

The oven rack was about 1/3 up off the electric oven floor. I preheated the oven @ 500 and then dropped it down to 475 right after the bread went in. I don't use the convection function.

It this a case where I could bake these on a baking stone?

 

[/url]

 

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

but flip the baking sheet  upside down without the foil.  Preheat the oven for a quarter of an hour then preheat the pan too.  Let the rim trap heat under the baking loaves.  Load the loaves/parchment onto the hot sheet.

The oven seems too hot to me.  Try this:  preheat lower & reduce the oven temp to 430°F during the bake.  See how that works out.  You may have to add some minutes to the bake.  

I'm guessing the foil was used to prevent burning?  

RichieRich's picture
RichieRich

Thanks, I'll try your suggestion next time I use that recipe. The foil, well my wife believes if you don't get something dirty you don't have to clean it. So the cookie sheet pretty much lives with foil on it. I'm going to buy another one just for my bread making.

 

Thanks.  RichieRich

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

You asked about baking stones - for sure you can use them instead of the baking sheet. You will need to pre-heat a stone for around 45 minutes to make sure it's good and hot, but I think you'll like the results. You might get better spring and better browning.

These loaves look good, really. I think there might have been a small effect from the late addition of salt, but probably more from the fact that it's hard to work something evenly and fully into dough that has already been kneaded to a smooth, elastic dough. Otherwise, you sort of had a 40 minute autolyse!

RichieRich's picture
RichieRich

Thanks for your response.  I'll portable pick up a stone in the near future.  What you though on baking stone v baking steels?

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Never tried steels. I have two slabs of granite about 1.25" thick that are off-cuts from a place that does granite counters. They were about $15 - $20 each, so probably cheaper than a 'baking steel' or stone!