The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Oat Porridge Sourdough Bread

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Oat Porridge Sourdough Bread

I have been tinkering, experimenting with various porridge breads for the past while; various attempts to create a lighter crumb, more custardy texture, deriving different flavours in the breads using various porridge mixtures while trying to keep a solid nutritional profile with the fresh milled grains and additions, using younger levains, varying final dough hydration. But sometime I just want a good porridge bread, like the one I first discovered working my way through Chad Robertson's Tartine 3...today was one of those days  Nothing complicated, this is an oat porridge bread made with fresh milled Red Fife (25%), filtered water (75%), young levain (22%), sea salt (2.2%), oat porridge addition (20%) after the third series of stretch and folds; FDH was probably about 80% after addition of the porridge.  Cold proofed overnight and baked in a Creuset covered 500 F/22 minutes; 450 F/10 minutes and uncovered out of the pots directly on the oven stone 450 F/20 minutes. Simple is often the best...

 

Comments

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I agree that simple is often best. I am intrigued by your adding porridge after 3rd set of s&f, crumb is lovely!

Glad you are back posting that is for sure.

Leslie

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Hi Leslie, I have tinkered with adding things right at the end of the autolyse as the bulk fermentation starts; after the first, second or third series of stretch and folds and for some things like cheese bits, during the final shaping.  My thinking for adding the porridge after the third series was focused on encouraging/strengthening the gluten structure and preserving the trapped fermentation gases as much as possible.  Just something to experiment with.  Thanks for having a look at my post!

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

with that gorgeous crumb! It is just beautiful and I know it must taste fantastic! I love the scoring on that first loaf. Very nicely done!

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Thanks Danni, baking bread is a good thing, like pottery classes, right?

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Absolutely! =-)

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Beautiful bake. I need to do more with porridge . I have plenty of stuff I can cook up and use. Have you tried stirring the porridge into your liquid before you autolyse so that it is all mixed in with the flour and then you wouldn't need to try and fold it in ? Just a thought as danni had mentioned that folding in her porridge was a bear of a  job. I remember the last polenta bread I made I thought of this too late. Perhaps I will remember and give it a try to see . Too many breads and ideas and so little tummy room !!   c

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Hi Trailrunner...yes, I have tried adding things at pretty much every point of the bread making process!  Porridge is interesting to me because it can change the overall character of the dough quite significantly - FDH is the first thing that comes to mind but also, depending on the physical nature of whatever porridge is being used, the strength and shape of the final proofed loaf.  As an example, I like to make a toasted seed porridge bread using various ground seeds cooked into a thick, shaggy porridge and incorporated into the dough late in the bulk ferment to prevent the coarse ground seeds from tearing up the gluten structure; this straight oat porridge bread has a softer oat porridge that I could have added, and have in previous bakes, at earlier stages of the dough preparation.  In my experience to date, it is good to think about how any additions might affect the bread dough and add them with that in mind, but in the end, experimenting and trying to develop a good sense for the dough development is what makes for consistent results, regardless of what/when is added.  

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

details. Thank you !  I will have to explore the porridge thing more. I did use polenta a couple times and loved the way the bread came out . I will venture into further territory soon. I don't worry about the gluten tearing so much since I do so little hands on. If I take the porridge and add it to all the liquids and then fold that into the flours it should be good. Then I can fold in the levain later as I have been doing. The porridge will be well mixed in that way with less effort. If you have any ideas on that let me know. Enjoy getting your take on things. c

bikeprof's picture
bikeprof

One of the things I have found that makes for easier incorporation of (at least oat) porridge, is the add some starter to it after it has sufficiently cooled the night before.  The result is similar to adding a bunch more water (but you get some extra flavor) - so the oats are quite soft.

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Hi bikeprof, that's a good suggestion...being able to tinker and adjust on the go is a valuable skill and this would allow some margin for dough hydration and extra flavour, thanks!

 

Elsasquerino's picture
Elsasquerino

Great looking loaf of bread. Thanks for sharing.

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Thank you Elsasquerino!

isand66's picture
isand66

You know by now my love for this style of bread and you hit the nail right on the head.

Regards,
Ian