The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Parchment sticking to baked loaves

2tattered's picture
2tattered

Parchment sticking to baked loaves

Hello! I am a new visitor. I love the ease of using parchment to transfer my sourdough boules to the hot Dutch oven for baking, but when they are done I find the paper has baked onto the surface of the loaves and is next to impossible to peel away. I see an old entry from 2009 where someone suggests using Reynold's non-stick foil instead of parchment. Does anyone currently use this? Any ideas about how to avoid the sticking issue with high-hydration doughs?

Thank you!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Have you tried flouring the bottom of the loaf in the banneton before turning it out? That helps for me. I also like a little cornmeal baked onto the bottom of the bread, so I’ll add that on occasion.

If nothing else works, maybe a little non-stick spray.

I never tried the foil.

Dan

breadboy025's picture
breadboy025

that sticking has happened to me too.  I've stopped using parchment with these high hydration doughs.  Best parchment I've used is from King Arthur Flour website--so maybe the type you are using is not "non-stick" enough? 

I echo these comments about cornmeal/semolina and flour on bottom of loaf.  Do you use a pizza stone or steel to bake?  Or a cast iron dutch oven?  Those may help to not even need the parchment. 

tgrayson's picture
tgrayson

What brand are you using? I had the sticking problem with some pre-cut sheets that I bought online, but I've never had this problem with Reynolds.

2tattered's picture
2tattered

 I've been using the parchment as a 'sling' to lower the loaf into a preheated cast iron Dutch oven. I've tried wheat bran, flour and semolina between bread and parchment but it still sticks. I've just ordered a Lodge cast-iron combo cooker to see if can get the same excellent bread using that, and just loading it off a peel. I also sometimes just bake on a stone, but like the shape of the loaves better when they have some support. So far, the Tartine bread is my favorite but is a lengthy project. When I want a quicker loaf I use the basic white sourdough recipe at theclevercarrot.com, and just add a bit more water to get the open crumb I like. That one doesn't stick as badly, because of the lower hydration, I guess, and it also has 25 grams of olive oil in the dough.

Thank you so much for your advice - I love this website!

2tattered's picture
2tattered

BTW, I use a cheap restaurant-grade parchment - maybe that's the problem. I'll try the Reynold's brand next time. Thanks!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Another TFL user (can‘t find the post to give credit) gave me a tip I’ll always use.

Before using the parchment crumple it up as much as you can. Then unfold and put your dough on it. You’ll be amazed how much better the paper conforms to the shape of the pot.

Dan

2tattered's picture
2tattered

Thanks, Dan!

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Interesting - wonder what the difference is.  I always rice flour the dough & banneton and parchment never sticks, even the cheaper brands or very wet dough.  For slings I've been using a giant Kirkland roll (thinner than Reynolds but fine for cookies or bread), or Reynolds if I have it.  For boules with add-ins like cheese or SD tomatoes that may burn directly on the stone, Regency pre-cut 10 or 12" cake rounds (also thin).  None are specially coated as non-stick.  Amazon for all.    

I have the Reynolds parchment w/foil, but have only used it to line the crock-pot for things that would get crusty/burnt on the outer edges.    

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Rice flour contains no gluten. That’s why it doesn’t stick like flour. I have a grain mill and make it on an as need basis.

2tattered's picture
2tattered

MontBayBaker - great idea! I often use rice flour in my bannetons, but didn’t think to try it with a parchment sling. I’ll give it a try this weekend. I’m also going to invest in some quality parchment.

Thank you!