The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

advice on dark rye

pul's picture
pul

advice on dark rye

Hi TFLers,

 

I love rye and it is the first time I baked using dark rye, which is coarser than the rye flour I have been using. I prepared a loaf based on the stuff below

 

Levain   
starter10g3.2%
dark rye50g16.1%
water70g22.6%
    
Final dough  
all levain130g41.9%
APF119g38.4%
dark rye136g43.9%
water142g45.8%
salt5g1.6%
    
total flour310g100.0%
total water217g70.0%

Matured levain for about 8 hrs. Mixed all ingredients (no autolyse), applied 3 stretches and folds, bulk fermented for about 6 horus over night. Shaped as batard, proofed for about 1 hr and half, and baked at 230C (hot oven/hot pot) for about 25 min lid on + 10 min lid off.

Picture of the crumb and crust shown below. Even though I used 40% APF, the crumb did not open much and the oven spring was shy. I would like to improve on these two aspects. I personally think I need to improve the strength of my levain (perhaps need a double build), and maybe autolyse the flour. How much autolyse time would be recommend? What else could I do to improve on these issues? Flavor-wise the the loaf tastes quite good. I love the rye notes that I can taste. Some sourness and also some subtle honey flavor brought out by the dark rye.

peter

 

 

 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

That is a beautiful loaf! Did you cut it while still a bit warm? The crumb has that appearance. With 40% rye, it will act more like rye than an AP loaf. It may need 24-48 hours for all the moisture to distribute evenly in the crumb.

If the rye flour you used was coarse-a bit like cornmeal or cream of wheat consistency, then the crumb will be a bit coarse even with a good soak.

Let me introduce you to Stan Ginsberg and his site-the Rye Baker. Here is a link for an article he wrote about different rye flours. Enjoy his site.

http://theryebaker.com/rye-flour/

pul's picture
pul

Hi Clazar, many thanks!

Yes, it was a bit warm since I was going to have lunch and wanted to have a piece. Next time, per your advice, I will wait longer (if I can, LOL).

I am happy with this loaf and 60% dark rye will make it more dense. However, I have seen 100% whole grain bakes around here that bloom like crazy. I would like to figure out how to achieve more spring oven (a bit more). The flour I am using is organic rye with bits that resemble corn meal, so it socked up some water.  

Thanks for the reference, it looks very useful with beautiful loaves.

peter

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

You may have to use a pan or form (and perhaps up the hydration 80 to 83%) to support the sides during the final rise and bake.  Love the entoxicating aromas of baking rye.  Will dare anyone to wait until it is cooled down and set for cutting with a sharp straight knife.  

The loaf looks lovely!  You won't have the doubling (100% or more) of volume like a wheat loaf, the rye won't let you but if you managed a minimum 50% increase in volume, you're doing well.  The loaf has a very nice lift on the shoulders and looks good!  

Mini

pul's picture
pul

Thanks Mini for the advice. I think I managed to get 50% increase in volume.

I will try to increase hydration and will report on the result.

peter

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

Your bread looks beautiful.. yet one more bread for me to bookmark and put in my 'must try one day' pile.. well done!

pul's picture
pul

Great! Just finished it for breakfast. Both flavor and texture were quite nice.

peter

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

you finished it.  

Good to save a slice or two, moisten and crumble into the next loaf. Gives great flavour and strange enough, more volume.  I tend to cut a few slices when a day old and freeze for the next loaf.  :)

Old bread is called "Altus" in case you were wondering... or not.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Shame Shame!!!

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

High percentage ryes do not benefit from stretch and fold because the gluten in rye doesn't have the stretching capability.  There's no expectation of a very open crumb, therefore, but in exchange a properly fermented loaf has a very tender crumb contrary to its dense look.  Hamelman and Ginsberg recommend you wait to cut into the loaf 12-48 hours after baking (depending on the recipe and percentage) on the higher percentage ryes to allow the crumb to set (i.e., not be gelatinous).

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

favorite is Minis 100% Dark Rye with Chia seeds at 104% hydration.  I make it with figs and walnuts.  I find autolysing 100% rye breads to be be a bit problematic since the enzymes in rye are totally different..... just like the bread itself - totally different. Mini's 100% Dark Rye & Chia Recipe ...Love at 104% hydration

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33328/minis-100-dark-rye-chia-recipe-love-104-hydration