The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

how to turn dry sourdough to active one.

Thaichef's picture
Thaichef

how to turn dry sourdough to active one.

I dried all my sourdough and keep it in a mason jar in the refrigerator. Now I would like to reactivate the dry sourdough to an active one and forgot how to do it.  Please help.

Thaichef.

 

 

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

It's only a matter of rehydrating the dry sourdough. You can start with a relatively small batch, say 50 g of warm water and 50 g of flour along with 5 or 6 g of the dried starter. Mix well and cover, then keep it at a warm temperature, between 74F and 82F. The first build may not be particularly active but as long as there's some activity after 12-16 hours, take a portion of that first build, 20-25 g, and then mix with your flour and water at a 1 part starter, 2 parts water, 2 parts flour. The second build will probably be more active and sooner than the first. While you could use the 2 stage build for bread, you'll be well rewarded if you do another build. The third build will likely be very active and good for baking. If you have the time and don't mind discarding starter, a few more builds will further improve the qualities of your revived starter.

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

I forgot to mention that you need to be aware of the quality of your water when rebuilding a starter.  If you're using water from the tap of a municipal source and the water has a smell, consider the possibility that the provider may have used chlorine during the processing. If so, you can get around this problem by simply measuring your water beforehand, covering the container with a clean towel, and letting it sit on the counter overnight before using. Another potential problem TFL folks have mentioned is "softened" water. Purified bottled water, with no minerals, presents problems as well. These situations have been discussed in threads that are archived on TFL.

I've also read that if your water is good enough to drink and tastes good, it's probably good enough to bake with. Save some of your dried starter as a "just in case" back up plan and go ahead with your best effort.

Thaichef's picture
Thaichef

Good Morning: Thank you again "Postal Grunt" for your advise. My water is well water and it was tested by the lab recently( I have to do it for licensing purpose because it is used in my cooking school  and I also doing food box service.  If you want to see my school please look into  Face book under: sml International cooking school)

I am re-hydrate my starter today using your method.  Even-though I am cooking all the time, I rather be making breads. Ha, Ha. 

Thanks again.

Thaichef. 

Ambimom's picture
Ambimom

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/guides/sourdough/starter.html

 

Just follow these tried and true steps.  KA starter is essentially the same thing as your dried.  

Thaichef's picture
Thaichef

Good Morning: My fresh loaf family come to my rescue again. Thank you. 

@ Postal Grunt. Thank you so very much.  Your comment is exactly what I need. I will follow it to the T. Fantastic. 

@Ambimom: Thank you but I do not want to start another starter.  I did it before and would rather "re-hydrate" my own starter which I save for this purpose. 

Thaichef.

Thaichef's picture
Thaichef

Good Afternoon: My question is to Postal Grunt Please. I have follow your advice above to the T and I am sad to say that it did  not seem to work at all. There is no bubbles, the starter seem to barely raised up. Yes, it is bigger than when I start the feeding but I thought that after 4 feeding already the result should be significant and it didn't. This is my details information:

1. st built 1/19/18 at 10.14 a.m.

2nd built 1/20/18 at 8.00 p.m. 

3. built 1/21/18 at 11.39 a.m.

4th built 1/22/18 at 10.12 p.m. 

The built information is the same everyday.  It is 25 g. starter, 50 G. flour (30 g. whole Rye+20 G.home mill whole wheat.)

I am very disappointed and disheartening . Am I ever going to be able to create a strong sourdough starter again????  

I was going to down load my picture of this sourdough but did not know how since the last time I did was in 2011. My picture was from my own smart phone and now on my desk top/Jpg  A very sad day.

Thai chef.

 

pmccool's picture
pmccool

If your starter is being kept at temperatures below 70F, that will certainly slow it down.

How did you select the feeding intervals?  The interval from 1 to 2 is 34 hours.  The interval from 2 to 3 is 15.5 hours.  The interval from 3 to 4 is about 35 hours.  If your starter is at all lively, those are plenty long enough for it to have peaked and collapsed which might leave you thinking that nothing had happened.  Were the feedings keyed to signs of fermentation (bubbling and odor)?  If there aren't indications of fermentation, the best thing is to give it a stir every few hours.  Once it bubbles up on its own, then feed it again.

I didn't see a mention of how much water you use at each of the feedings.

Stick with it.  It will eventually come around, if you give it the chance to do so.

Paul

Thaichef's picture
Thaichef

Good Afternoon Paul: 

Thank you for your quick reply. the feeding time is different because that was when I have the time. Now that you pointed it out, I will try to stick to more of the same time frame

Temperature:  Room temperature between 73-75 degree fahrenheit. The odor seem sweet like regular sourdough and when I tasted it( on my 4th feeding at about 10.12 p.m. it was very sour. My starter is kept at room temperature.  The water is the same amount as the flour 50 gram per the advice of Postal Grunt above.  So it is 25 gram starter, 50 gram flour and water.

Per your post above, "the best thing is to give it a stir every few hours......." Does that mean that I have to feed it more than once a day?  From the advice of postal grunt above I thought that I have to feed it may be once a day.( I did not know that it was 35 hour in between.) I think that I had been busied and forgot to feed it at the exact time.  Now will try to do better.

Thanks again.

Thai chef. 

pmccool's picture
pmccool

but there are advantages in a regular feeding schedule.  With room temperature in the low 70s, a 12-hour schedule might be more effective.  

If you are able to check on the starter several times between feedings, you will be able to see how quickly or slowly it grows.  You will also be able to see how much it expands before collapsing.  Without any observations, there's no way to know what the starter is doing.    

My guess is that the starter was active and had already collapsed by the time  you were able to feed it again.  If your schedule allows, check it every hour or two after feeding to see what it is up to. 

Paul