The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Ankarsrum RPM Stats

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Ankarsrum RPM Stats

I recently became interested in fully developing the dough. It seems that complete development occurs somewhere around 2000 revolutions.

If you are interested is learning more about Gluten development, here is an excellent link. Pay special attention to replies from Mariana.  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54803/chasing-thin-crispy-not-thicktough-dough

Anyway, I actually counted the revolutions on my Ankarsrum. They are listed below. Speeds are referred to as 12 o'clock, 1 o'clock etc.

!2:00         42 RPM
1:00          66
2:00          80
3:00          97
4:00          116
5:00           I feel down in a drunken state, couldn't count ;-)

By-the-way; I was mixing 1000g of 67% white flour dough. Initial dough temperature was 71° and after 13 minutes of kneading a various speeds (highest was 4 o'clock) the dough temperature was only 74°. I used the Roller and hook at all times. Now, that was impressive.

Dan

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Dan, just for clarity, do you have the 450 watt version or the 600 watt version.  IIRC, the 600 watt version has a higher top speed than the 450 watt models. 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Barry, I’ve got the latest model, so 600 watts.

I placed a piece of tape on the bowl, ran my phone’s timer set to 1 minute, and then counted the revolutions. It was pretty easy. I never made it to top speed, since I don’t run sustained speeds over 4 o’clock.

Is the 450 watt unit geared differently?

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Dan, the Ank does not use gears, it appears to be electronic control of the motor.  My understanding from the Bread Beckers video is that the 600 watt version that you have has a high top speed than the 450 version, and while I am not a big fan of the methods in the Bread Becker videos, they suggest that the knob be set to full speed to knead in the 450 version, but not that high in the 600 version, and that top speed is only for certain things - my guess is whipping egg whites and such.  

tgrayson's picture
tgrayson

They publish the min and max RPM on their site, so you probably could have calculated these speeds. FYI, they show low speed as 45.

Dulcilo's picture
Dulcilo

Thanks for your posts on using your Ankarsrum, Dan. I have just entered the world of bread making and my first move was to replace an old leaking KA with a new Ankarsrum. I have watched all the videos I can find on YouTube about it. I made Ashley McCord’s favorite bread recipe, just to learn from it. We didn’t care for the bread that much—not that it went to waste : ) But I want to make more than sandwhich breads. Do you adapt her recommended technique of putting the liquids in first, then the flour mixture, even if the recipe says the opposite? With which do you add the yeast? And salt? Does it make a difference? I have been using the roller rather than the dough hook, and only got the “donut” with her recipe. The other recipes just balled up. The roller still seemed to be knead successfully however. Any tips you have learned along the way? Thanks.

tgrayson's picture
tgrayson

I ignore the "put liquids in first" advice and it works fine. I always do dry ingredients first, because I use the mixer to combine the flour, salt, and yeast.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Ashley is a great phone friend of mine. She has been very helpful to me. I studied all of her videos when I first started using the Ankarsrum. But the very best help I got was from users on this forum.

I suggest you search this forum using the keyword, “Ankarsrum”. My biggest revelation was this. Mix your liquids first, then combine your dry ingredients (including salt and yeast) in a separate bowl. With the mixer speed set around the 2 o’clock position dump all dry ingredients into the wet at once. Mix until combined. You may have to swing the roller towards the middle to catch all dry ingredients. It won’t look pretty at this stage. Once all is incorporated remove the roller and scraper and put the lid on. Let that rest (autolyse) for 20 - 30 minutes. The autolyse is a great help. During that time your dry ingredients are hydrated, making mixing much more efficient. Then continue mixing with roller and scraper. I suggest to don’t go past 4 o’clock (speed) for bread. I find it takes a little longer to develop gluten with the Ank, others claim the opposite. But extended mixing does not adversely affect the dough because this mixer is very gentle and doesn’t excessively overheat it.

The common issues with KA are non existent with the Ank. At least that is what I’ve read and experienced so far. I don’t expect burnt motors or stripped gears with this baby. 

This is the difficult part. You need to forget about your kneading experience with the KA. That’s what got me into trouble. You have a top knot bread mixer, but there is a learning curve, especially when you have experience with another type mixer. 

Let us know how you progress. We’re here to help.

Dan

If you need extra help, go to my profile and send me a private message. If you send me your number and a good time to reach you, I’ll give you a call. I assume you live in the states.