The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Classic Sourdoughs by Ed Wood & Jean Wood

Sour_Baker's picture
Sour_Baker

Classic Sourdoughs by Ed Wood & Jean Wood

I'm trying to use the Sourdough Pizza recipe. This is my first time using it and I was wondering if anyone else has used this recipe before

 

360 ml starter

980g AP flour

600 ml water

1 1/2 tsp salt

 

This recipe seems super super sticky to me, but then I'm not used to high hydration recipes at all. When I got to the part to separate into 6 balls, the dough wasn't working with me at all. It stuck to everything. I tried to wet my hands a bit so I could at least shape them, but that didn't work out too well. I ended up using flour just to work with it. Im wondering if I'm wrong and shouldn't use the flour.

 

Also, if this would help anything, my starter is 100% WW and over a month old.

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

The first thing that popped into my head was that 360ml starter is left wide open to interpretation. What flour is this starter made from? And what is the hydration? 

Everything else is exact measurement which makes the starter more confusing. 

The only thing I can think of is... Is there anywhere one would find instruction of how to make a starter by these author bakers? That would be a good start. 

Also what is your starter maintenance and how did you prep it for use? 

Sour_Baker's picture
Sour_Baker

I looked at the book, there was 2 ways for the starter. 1 was was activating a dry starter. The 2nd one was making your own starter, titled Capturing Your Own Starter which says to mix 2 cups (280g) flour and 1 1/2 cups (380 ml) of water, stir twice very 24 hours for 3 days, then feed it 140g flour and sufficient water to maintain a consistency and stir.

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

I don't think it's the hydration of your starter that is to blame. 

Now a bit more about your starter, how you maintain it and prep it for baking. 

What are the basic instructions for the recipe you're following. And what flour are you using? 

Sour_Baker's picture
Sour_Baker

I maintain my starter in the fridge and would feed once a week if I wasn't doing much. But I feed after pulling it out of the fridge and discarding some to wake it up. Then I build for the bake by feeding it how much starter I need. 

 

Recipe:

Mix together the culture, flour, water, and salt in large mixing bowl and knead for at least 30 minutes to develop the gluten. Place dough in a bowl and over it with plastic wrap, and proof for 4 hours at 77 to 82 degrees in a proofing box. Punch down and divide into 6 balls, about 8 oz (250g) each. Place balls on a baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap and proof for an additional 4 hours at room temp, around 70 degrees.

Then after that, it's shaping, resting for 1 hour and last but not least baking at 500 degrees for 7 to 9 minutes

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

Without knowing how much starter to fresh flour in your feeds I'm to venture a guess here. The flour in your starter that is kept in the fridge is going to be very fermented and broken down after a week. I'd build a levain using a small amount of starter and a greater amount of fresh flour. Stick to 100% hydration starter for now as it is a very wet dough when using their starter. 

Take off some starter and try an overnight feed if 1:5:5. Use the next morning when mature. 

When making the dough hold some of the water back and slowly add it when forming the dough if you think it needs it. The dough should be sticky but not so much that it's all coming off in your hands. Try and get it as high as possible but you're still able to handle it. I know you're not confident in high hydration doughs (neither am i) but try and go just a little outside your comfort zone and push the boundaries a tad. But don't feel you have to go as high as the recipe. Go by feel. 

Follow the recipe and before shaping into balls put the dough in the fridge for about 30 minutes. Cold dough is easier to handle. Also run your hands under the cold tap as warm hands make it more difficult to handle. Don't forget it might take longer to final proof as the dough is now cold. 

Best of luck and let me know how it goes. 

rollingyogi's picture
rollingyogi

I made this pizza dough recipe a few weeks ago.  I've made three pizzas and still have three dough balls in the freezer.  Did you have problems with sticky dough during the 30 min kneading or only after the first proof?  I always hold back some flour to use during the kneading process.  But after the first proof I also use a small amount of flour on the table while I divide the dough and shape into balls. My finished pizza crusts came out only Ok not great. But I think it was my own fault as I wanted a thin crust and so I stretched the dough more than was recommended. For the last three I will adhere to the 10 inch size recommended in the recipe.  I hope this was helpful 

Sour_Baker's picture
Sour_Baker

It wasn’t too bad with the kneading the first 30 minutes. Still sticky but ok. It was after the first proofing. It was just horrible. It didn’t hold any of its shape when I tried to make it into balls