The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Croissants - one step back

kendalm's picture
kendalm

Croissants - one step back

As we all know, progress is not made without setbacks. A few weeks ago I did croissants and saw more separation of layers and got really excited. On top of the visual improvement, the eating experience was also significantly improved. So, trying to recall what I did on thay bake and trying to replicate, layers barely separated - real bummer. Tried using the same butter and other ingredients but for some reason it just wasnt the same or better. The frustrating part about a new project like this is not havong enough experience to both know and guage progress during each phase. In particular final proofing. I know timing to the minute on bread but on final proof I found myself wondering - should I wait, should I bake. I do understand that with laminates is beat to proof cool and doba considerably long final (2+ hours) just dont know exactly whats best .. Other than keep trying (disappointing crumb l on the way)

Comments

kendalm's picture
kendalm

Heres todays croissant crumb.  Trying to understand why theres very little separation this time and beginning to think that i maybe over-proofed these.  The reason for that thought is based on the fact that they reached up much higher in the oven and then started to deflate.  I dont thing lamination is as much a problem as the pain aux chocolates, whose profile presents a good view of layering, show very distinct layering.  Also during the lamination I didnt see any telltale signs of exploding butter or crumbing butter - it seemed to go rather well especially considering there was no rushing involved.  If anyone who has more experience can drop a hint that please divulge ! 

kendalm's picture
kendalm

Heres one of the pain aux chocolate .. Chocolate and pistacio. Separation occurred tonsome extent. Still wondering how it all works with laminates - the pockets of expansion are between layers and not in the dough gas cavities. With plain bread I can almost plan the character of open crumb mostly due to many times repeating a similar procedure and noting results.  In this case I dont ecen know why layers separate when heated - does more fast heat help or less ? Does more fat in the dough cause butter and dough to fuse - hoping for a croissanteer to chime in (please please please) 

kendalm's picture
kendalm

A couple of additional shot to deconstruct and figure it out - 

Layers - showing that lamination did indeed produce a good supply of layers 

 

 

Mild separation and inflation - it aplear both from this shot and from watching the bake that we had inflation (aka oven spring) followed by deflation.  There are obviously cavities across several layers here but just no volume - why did it deflate ? 

 

 

 

 

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

on yourself! Those look amazing even if they aren't up to your standards. At least, you get to eat the results. All we can do on the other side of the screen is drool!

kendalm's picture
kendalm

Especially with pastries - however understanding whats going on a learning to control it is a close second. It took a whole fimigure out crumb management on plajn bread and so, finding this stuff is,such a different animal - they will succumb !