The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Honey Spelt Oat Porridge Sourdough with Cranberries and Pumpkin Seeds

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Honey Spelt Oat Porridge Sourdough with Cranberries and Pumpkin Seeds

I am continuing my exploration of true porridge breads and for Canadian Thanksgiving, I decided to add pumpkin seeds and cranberries to the basic loaf. I did make one batch without the cranberries and pumpkin seeds to take to my brother's house tomorrow and it turned out wonderful so the cranberries and the pumpkin seeds are optional. You could actually add any type of add-in that doesn't require soaking or doesn't absorb too much moisture from the dough such as sprouts, sunflower seeds, nuts or dried fruit.

1. Toast 125 g of large flake oats. When toasted add 25 g of oat bran to the oats.

2. Mix together 345 g of water and 75 g of organic plain yogurt. 

3. Pour 3/4 of the water/yogurt mixture into the oats and cook on medium heat until water is absorbed. Add the remainder of the water/yogurt mixture and cook on low heat until creamy. Cool until just warm.

4. In a large bowl, place 650 g of unbleached flour, 302 g of freshly milled spelt flour, 50 g of freshly ground flax seed, 75 g of dried cranberries (optional), 75 g of pumpkin seeds (optional and these could be toasted as well), all of the oat porridge, 50 g of honey and 550 g of filtered water. Mix well and let the mixture sit for a couple of hours.

5. Add 22 g of sea salt and 266 g of 80% 4-stage levain. (My levain is all freshly milled rye for the first 3 stages and 1/4 rye and 3/4 unbleached flour for the last stage. The first 3 stages are about 12 hours apart and the last stage takes less than 4 hours to triple.) Mix in well using folding and pinching until you see some gluten development which takes about 5 minutes.

6. Let rest 45 minutes and do a set of folds. Repeat two more times and then let sit in a warm place until it has doubled. You can use the fridge to slow it down if needed.

7. Divide into portions of ~880 g and do a loose pre-shape. Let rest 10-15 minutes and then shape tightly into a boule. Place boules in rice/unbleached floured bannetons and cover with a plastic shower cap or bowl cover. Place into fridge overnight (10-12 hours).

8. Heat oven and Dutch ovens to 475 F for at least 45 minutes. Place parchment rounds in the bottom of the pots and put the loaves directly out of the fridge into the pots. Bake at 450 F for 25 minutes, remove lids, drop temperature to 425 F and bake a further 25 minutes.

9. Let cool completely before placing into a plastic bag for storage. I find that plastic seems to work best for me in keeping the crumb moist and the crust soft. I have family and friends that complain about a too crunchy crust (rolling my eyes here). 

The loaf below is one of the ones without the add-ins. The others with the add-ins are all for other people.

Comments

Elsasquerino's picture
Elsasquerino

Another great bake Danni, gonna have to try these porridge breads they always look and sound so tasty!

isand66's picture
isand66

My wife  roasted some pumpkin seeds last weekend and I just bought some more cranberries and dried cherries today so I will have to give this one a try next.  The crumb looks nice and open and moist just like it's supposed to.  I am actually mixing a porridge bread up as I type this but no seeds in this one.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Best,

Ian

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Its good to hear if others are able to duplicate the results. And thank you for the good wishes. 

bread1965's picture
bread1965

Your crumb looks amazing.. it looks like  a beautifully soft crumb.. well done .. it's getting to the point that when I get the daily freshloaf email, and see a loaf I already know if it's yours.. the consistency is remarkable.. I will give this loaf a try.. have a great thanksgiving weekend!

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

or my butcher block island top probably give it away. Ha ha!

Actually, I am pleased that i am able to have such consistency and it is probably due to sticking to a base recipe and tweaking the add-ins and the water. It also helps to have a sense of how much whole grain I can add to a loaf with coming out with too heavy a crumb.

I have learned an awful lot over the past 2 years. I never thought I would get to the point of being able to create my own recipes and have them actually turn out. It is thanks to all of you for sharing and contributing your ideas and recipes!

bread1965's picture
bread1965

I think it's that your rise is so good on each bread.. and you don't score, and put your breads in the basket seam side down.. and you consistently bake to the same level of dark crust.. all your breads, they have a "look".. which I love..

Like anything in life, it's all about "going deep".. focus on one thing and after a while you get really good at it.. photography, musical instruments, carpentry, baking.. you're very accomplished and should be very proud of what you've been able to achieve!

So tell me.. what's the most whole grain you feel should be the limit in a loaf?

Gobble gobble..

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

up to and past 50%. My loaves are closer to 40% when I calculate the amount of whole grains in my starter and my dough.

When I add whole grain porridge, I cut back on the amount of whole grain flour and use a bit more unbleached flour to help with the rise. Well what do you know? I just did the calculations and I ended up with 40% whole grain there too. So I guess 40% is my sweet spot. 

bread1965's picture
bread1965

Will try one over the next few weeks !

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I am in Toronto on the 16th to the 18th with my daughter for a medical appointment. Want to meet up and bring you a loaf? I haven’t decided yet what I am baking next weekend though. 

bread1965's picture
bread1965

Yes and thanks! Let's connect later in the week and figure out when.. I hope all is well with your daughter.. thanks Danni.. !

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Its a regular appointment with her rheumatologist. So nothing dire thank goodness!

Looking to hear from you later. :-)

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Wow, what a great combination of things! I love the idea of the cranberries and pepitas; sounds so yummy. :) And that crumb is to die for - so soft and moist. Do you think the yogurt adds to the crumb texture, or to the flavour, or something more?

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

adds to the crumb texture. I think it softens it like added fat would since the yogurt I use is a locally made full fat one. I know that my crusts seem to be much thinner and crispier than when I didn’t use it once the loaf cools. They soften completely in the plastic bag. 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

Cranberries in all sorts of combinations seem to be the in thing at the moment! the crumb is wonderful.  you certainly turn out consistently great breads.  Love it!

Leslie

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

too shabby, neither ;)

I can absolutely see the moistness from the porridge in that crumb, and - as usual - your choice of flavours to add in sounds scrumptious.

I hope you and yours are enjoying a lovely Thanksgiving with all of the love and laughter and other good things that you so much deserve!

Best, Laurie