The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

covering dough with cling film/wrap

mutantspace's picture
mutantspace

covering dough with cling film/wrap

a problem.

At home  i place my dough into a banneton and cover it withoiled cling film and leave itto proof. Perfect.

However, ive started baking in a rented bakery and because im making alot more bread am now using couches and bannetons as I can afford loads of bannetons  - im slowly buying them over time - so my problem is this; Ive been using cling film to cover the dough once its in the couches but its sticking and i dont know how to resolve the issue. I do lightly oil it but im nervous as i dont want the oil to seep into the linen. Im wondering if i could simply leave them uncovered or would the sourdough dry out too much? Or is there another fabric i could use? Or will i oil the cling more? does it matter? any suggestions?   

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

If I'm letting dough in bannetons proof for two hours or less I cover it with dry cotton napkins or kitchen towels. If it is going in the fridge overnight then I put the whole thing (covered with the napkin) into a plastic bag. The napkin absorbs the moisture from the dough and stays damp inside the bag, while preventing condensation from building up on the surface of the dough.

mutantspace's picture
mutantspace

oiled cling film on bannetons works for me its just what to cover couches if i dont have enough couches to fold over themselves if you know what i mean....at the moment im using cling film but its not great cause its sticking a bit and i dont want oil on the fabric...and to cover 6 couches with floured tea towels or any sort of fabric is alot of fabric....the problem will be solved in time as i buy more couches but i need a stop gap solution...

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I think that would work fair well and be cheap if you can find one in your linen closet. 

mutantspace's picture
mutantspace

what a bloody brilliant Idea!! Ha. Fantastic! sheets it is

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Glad I was able to help. :-D

mutantspace's picture
mutantspace

me too :)

Cynky's picture
Cynky

I buy a pack of cheap see through shower caps, about 4 for £1 at Boots in UK.  They work. really well, and last a while too.

mutantspace's picture
mutantspace

good idea but its for the couches i need the covering - simple fact is that im using couches cause i cant afford loads of bannetons (i need at least 40) so with the bannetons i have i have i use cling film which is fine but i cant afford to use the couches properly i.e. put on dough and fold couche in on itself so ive been using cling film on them and its sticking so i think sheet is a great idea - is cheap and possibly free if i can convince my wife to take an old one from the press  and cover it in flour 

Trevor J Wilson's picture
Trevor J Wilson

It's common in bakeries to use a plastic garbage bag -- sometimes cut at the seam in order to open it wide -- to cover a board of bannetons or a board with loaves proofing in a couche. Usually a dusting of flour is thrown on top of the exposed portion of the loaves before the plastic is laid on top in order to prevent sticking (how heavy the dusting depends on how sticky the dough tends to be). 

Trevor

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

made of food safe plastic...,

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Other than sheet pans of sweet rolls proofed overnight in the fridge, I've been using Cover Mate food covers from Smart & Final.  A variety pack of 10 (4 sizes) was maybe $6 at Smart & Final and have been washed and re-used for 2+ years for bread-making only.  They work well on proofing/soaker/starter bowls & Cambros, bannetons, and loaf pans (though some loaf pans need a tiny binder clip on each edge to stop the cover slipping down - might be my USA pans).  I rarely need to oil the inside.  For proofing wet doughs in the fridge I cover with a floured fabric napkin under the cover.  I'm sure you can find these covers at a dollar store or in bulk somewhere.  

Lacking a proof box, for double French bread pans or multiple smaller items sometimes I use a giant bag that held Guittard chocolate (bought in bulk via a co-op) on a sheet pan, with a couple of tall cans to keep the tent up - closed with large binder clips.  Good luck!

mutantspace's picture
mutantspace

all great ideas and the more that come in the more i realise how unimaginative ive been. large plastic bags....i have tonnes of those as i use them to cover the 25kg bags of flour and in the bakery....theyre sitting infront of me. excellent....bags and linen it is. Ad for stretchable fod covers - havent seen them on Irish shelves but will have a look.

many thanks