The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pecan Cherry Cranberry Porridge Bread

isand66's picture
isand66

Pecan Cherry Cranberry Porridge Bread

  This is one of my favorite breads I've made to date.  I love porridge breads and the combination of pecans, cherries and cranberries really just made this one hard to resist.  I brought one loaf into work and wished I had saved it for myself :).

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.   You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4's of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients except for the cranberries, in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk along with the cranberries and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

First add the cranberries and dried cherries to the water and let them soften for about 30 minutes or longer.

Next, mix the flours  and the water for about 1 minute (reserve the cherries and cranberries for later).  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge, olive oil and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Now add the pecans and re-hydrated cherries and cranberries and mix on low for another minute until they are incorporated.    Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1 hour.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

 

Comments

cgap's picture
cgap

There's nothing wrong with complicated recipes. I look at it as a challenge to see if I can do it.

I do a lot of "Modernist" cooking which sometimes can take several days and up to 20 or more different steps to make a dish from start to plate, not to mention a number of ingredients which admittedly, most people won't have in their pantry but, the end result is (usually) worth it.

And the simple baguettes I made today were a complete disaster.

isand66's picture
isand66

I agree with your sentiment.  Sometimes the simplest recipe is the hardest to master.  My porridge breads are an adaptation of Chad Robertson's version and while not simple they are far from over complicated.  I would have been happy to suggest to the person who complained about my recipe being to complicated that they could easily substitute the ingredients with something similar.

Anyway, thanks for your input.

Regards,
Ian

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I haven't been able to find these here - what could I substitute? I have frozen cherries in the freezer - would that work if they were thoroughly drained or would that add too much moisture to the dough? they would break up bit I guess

any way, nice bake as always Ian

Leslie

isand66's picture
isand66

If you can't find the cherries you can either just use all cranberries or certainly use the frozen cherries.  I would drain them as you suggest and pat them dry and just watch your hydration level.  I always like to leave some of the water for the second mix so I can adjust if the dough is getting over-hydrated. 

You can also find the cherries on-line but they may be a bit pricey.

If you don't have a French style flour (I use the one from King Arthur Flour) you can also use AP or Bread flour.

Let me know if you give this a try and enjoy it as much as I did.

Regards,
Ian

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

With that extra moist and tender crumb from the porridge, I don't blame you for regretting your generosity!  The great thing, though, is that you can always bake yourself up another loaf to replace it...

Isn't it grand that the "very best bread" is such an individual thing, and that there are different flours and mixin's and techniques to let us each figure out what our favourite bread is --- even if that favourite changes with each new bake!  There are times when a simple lean dough can't be beat, and others when it is all about the complex flavours and textures that are the result of thoughtful combinations of ingredients. 

It really looks like a grand bake, Ian - and inspiring as always! 

All the best to you and yours (with extra scritches to all the fuzz-butts)

Laurie

isand66's picture
isand66

Always appreciate your kind words.  I agree, my favorite bake changes from week to week :), but I do love pecans and cherries! 

Glad you like this one and look forward to your next post.

Regards,
Ian

Flour.ish.en's picture
Flour.ish.en

There is nothing complicated about making this bread. I do more or less the same with porridge bread, except I do a cold retard when proofing the dough and you do a cold bulk ferment. I wonder how that affects the final loaf. Surprised you have to crank up the oven to 550°F. But it makes sense before the interior tends to be get tight and gummy, from my experience. Happy baking!

isand66's picture
isand66

I find doing the bulk ferment fits into my schedule better.  I know a lot of people prefer to do it your way and get great results.  One of these days I need to try it both ways and see the difference if any.  I did try it your way a few times but it was so long ago I don't remember anymore how it came out.

I find cranking the oven up to its highest for the initial steaming works best.  I used to only go to 500 but found the higher temp worked a little better.

Happy Baking.

Ian

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

Loving this bread Ian. Thank you for introducing me to porridge breads. Riding high in the last recipe you were kind enough to share and incorporating some of the things I've learned into this week's bake. 

This one is on my list of breads to do. 

isand66's picture
isand66

I am glad I could inspire you to try porridge breads.  Once you get hooked on them it's hard to resist.  I hope you do get a chance to try this one and if you don't have the same exact flours, not to worry; just sub something similar and it will taste great in the end.

Look forward to hearing how your bake comes out.

Regards,

Ian

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I am just starting to copy your method for cooking the porridge. I didn’t realize that you continued to cook it after the second addition of liquid. I have been taking it off the heat and letting it absorb on its own at room temperature. I still ended up with a pretty creamy porridge. 

Last week I complained about the extra fussy step but this week I cooked all the porridge together for my four batches and that really helped in saving time. I just weighed the whole thing when done and divided by four. I did forget to toast it though. 

As to the comment above, this is where we share our creations. Not someplace where we cater to the most common elements. Sheesh!

isand66's picture
isand66

I'm sure your method of taking it off the heat works just as well.  If you end up with a cream porridge that's all that matters.

I usually don't toast the dry ingredients and when I have I didn't notice that much difference but I'm sure it can't hurt.

As far as the comment, I have been posting on this site for quite some time now and have had few issues.  Not quite sure why we can't all be positive.  At least that what I try to do or I simply don't comment.

Anyway, thanks for your comment and I look forward to seeing your next post.  I have a simple spelt type loaf about to go in the oven in a few minutes.  Let's hope for success :).

Happy Baking.

Ian

Gill63's picture
Gill63

Sounds and looks delicious. Feel inspired to try this porridle bread! Dried cherries from Costco in my cupboard, so no issues there, but not sure if I should reduce hydration as will be using UK flour ...

isand66's picture
isand66

I would just hold back about 100 or so grams of the water and add it as needed during the final mix.  This is a wet bread but you don't want soup either :).  Feel free to ask me anything else if you need clarification.

Good luck!

Ian

nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

Just checking in after a couple of weeks away, and found your lovely porridge bread. One of the great things about making bread, is that you can make it to suit your needs and preferences. Especially nice is the ability to load it up with chunky toasted nuts, lively seeds and succulent fruits.I'll guess this one is now just a memory, but a quite a fond one!

All the best, Ian!

Cathy

isand66's picture
isand66

Welcome back!  I hope you had a good trip.  Glad you like this one.  It's long gone but I need to bake again soon :).

Look forward to seeing some Baking from you soon.

Regards,

Ian

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

Ian I cannot get barley flakes here, so would you substitute more rolled oats? Alternatively, I have a small amount of barley flour, would that be a possible substitution even though texture is of course different.

I plan to have a go at this recipe in next few days.

Leslie

isand66's picture
isand66

I would use the oats and not the flour.  I think that would work out best.  Good luck and can’t wait to hear how it came out.

Regards,

ian

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

will let you know hoe it turns out.

Leslie