The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Chestnut flour, any recipies

gillpugh's picture
gillpugh

Chestnut flour, any recipies

ive got some flour and I've some peeled whole, just need a recipe now.  Ive been looking at old threads and not sure if 10 percent is too much or too little. what percentage should I put in?

its quite expensive so I don't want to mess up.  I've also seen a post using   Chocolate powder in the mix, but with that and the chestnut flour how could I make up for lack of gluten in these items?

ill be doing it this week end so fingers crossed. 

Thanks 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I wouldn't go over 33% non gluten flours of the total flour as they will not contribute to a gluten matrix.  At least for the first round.  Chestnuts taste a lot like potatoes so pre-roasting, boiled or candied chestnuts might also be fun and an interesting addition.   So might rolling a loaf in chestnut flour after shaping for a nutty aromatic crust.  A scoring could be sprinkled with raw chestnut pieces for another effect.  Or chopped nuts used like the seeds to separate sections as in the front page loaf.

Start with a small loaf and 10% to see what it tastes like to you and go from there. 

gillpugh's picture
gillpugh

Thanks minioven , I'll try 10% of chestnut flour and then also add some chopped chestnuts either in dough or on the top, or both!   Chestnut overload!  

 

Have you ever made bread with coco powder?  Is it worth it? Sounds fabulous, can taste it now, toasted with salted butter!!  Or is it just a label appeal recipe.

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I think you mean chocolate powder as you mentioned in the initial post.  Remember that wheat flours will tend to dilute flavours so if there isn't enough of it, it will only colour the dough.  If brownie or deep chocolate flavour is what you want then go for brownies.  I haven't found a chocolate bread recipe that can beat brownies.  Naturally cutting back the sugar would turn it into bread.  Or would it?  The line is grey and fuzzy between them.  A good amount of fat helps to carry the flavour.  Chocolate is very moisture absorbing but slow at doing so and takes at least 15 minutes to hydrate so take care kneading or working in more flour until the flour and ingredients have had a chance to just stand there for 15 to 20 minutes. 

Careful you don't knock out the chestnut taste with chocolate.  So dump a lot of each into it!  Lol!  

gillpugh's picture
gillpugh

I'll do a small chocolate /chestnut one to see how it turns out. ill use coco powder which has a stronger taste. Chocolate powder i was thinking of using has added milk powder and sugar, as you say, it will be more cake than bread, and I'm looking for bitter chocolate, sour dough bread taste, with hint of sweet chestnuts!  In my dreams !

Thanks for Help 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

this recipe pops up, you don't need to add the spices if you don't want to. I haven't baked it.  ...yet

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/36717/chestnut-flour-speculoos-non-sweet-breakfast-bread

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

If you add a lot of chocolate to a dough, chocolate can burn easily, so it might be smart to lower the normal baking temperature and bake a little longer.

gillpugh's picture
gillpugh

Thanks for that, my search skills need improving as I couldn't find what I was looking for and I've already made the bread!!..  Bread is in fridge tonight and I will be baking 9am tomorrow morning, so just in time for the tip about temperature.

ive made two loaves, one chetnut flour/ grated chestnuts, and one, chocolate/ chestnut flour/ grated chestnuts.

at the moment the chocolate one does not have so much rise as the first loaf.  The coco powder I suspect is hindering the process

ill post photos tomorrow.