The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

First attempt at new pizza dough recipe and first photo post

maxamilliankolbe's picture
maxamilliankolbe

First attempt at new pizza dough recipe and first photo post

pizza

pizza2

pizza3

Hello, everybody! This is my first photo post (gee, I hope it shows up...) and also my first attempt at making a new pizza dough. I received Crust and Crumb by Peter Reinhart for Christmas (I was ecstatic!!) and this was my first bake. I made both of the doughs he included in the book for the same night, and both were by far the best pizza dough I've ever made! We especially love NJ (NY) style pizza so are looking for something that approximates it. These pictures are of the Pizza I recipe. The Pizza II recipe I didn't get a picture of, well, frankly, because it was gone by the time I got around to taking pictures!! Pizza II was closer to NJ style (we think), which is why it was gone so quickly, but the Pizza I crust was noticeably more tender. Both began with a poolish, however Pizza I, a much more wet dough much like ciabatta, was allowed to rise for 3 hours before retarding overnight in the fridge. Pizza II was much more firm and was allowed to ferment for 1 hour, divided, and ferment (I'm guessing that's what you'd call it) again for another hour before rolling out and baking. Pizza II was by far the simpler of the two. I guess I can't complain if that's the one my husband likes the best! The crust in the pictures is very tender and light with some nice holes in the crust around the edges. It ended up quite thin everywhere else, which was wonderful. Unfortunately we aren't big outer crust fans -- why eat just a bready outer crust when it, too, can have sauce and cheese on it?? Just our philosophy. Oh, and no, we do not eat next to the Christmas tree. It just looks nice. And I love Christmas! I'd be glad if anyone has any ideas on other crust recipes that would be similar to what you can get at a pizzeria in NJ or NY... man, they just have the best pizza. I do have a tip, though... Don't drool on the computer looking at the pictures. It's not good for the keys. :)

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Your pizza is so delicious looking I want some now! Great job. What did you use for sauce?         weavershouse

maxamilliankolbe's picture
maxamilliankolbe

Thanks for the complement!  I have such a weak spot for pizza.  It is the perfect food - appropriate for all meals in the day!

 

I always just wing it with the sauce.  I grew up using a combo of Contadina and Pastorelli sauces, adding the usual (well, for me) garlic powder, fennel seed, and oregano, as well as some Parmasan and/or Romano.  Pastorelli is a hard find and I'm just not crazy abount Hunt's (sorry Hunt's lovers), so I've recently flirted with Muir Glen pizza sauce and Dei Fratelli's pizza sauce.  Both are good, but they just don't quite do it for me.  To get to your question, these pizzas use Muir Glen fire roasted diced tomatoes that have been somewhat pureed to make it a little more saucy.  I then added some Tuscan Sunset (an Italian herb blend from Penzeys Spices -- an AMAZING blend that has basil, oregano, fennel seed, garlic, aleppo pepper, anise seed, and more!!)  It was good, and the fire roasted part was definitely a flavor I'd like to keep, but I'm still searching.

Funny, I can't seem to get my tomato sauce just right for spaghetti, either.

mkelly27's picture
mkelly27

go simple.  try some San Marzano DOP whole tomatoes (hand crush them) with some onion, salt,  and oregano

_______________________________________________________

Two wrongs don't make a right. Three lefts make a right

maxamilliankolbe's picture
maxamilliankolbe

If you mean San Marzano, the brand of canned tomatoes, I would love to use them but unfortunately in Omaha they just don't carry that brand.  We also do not have any Italian markets or delis out here - unless TrishinOmaha knows of any.  Perhaps this summer I'll grow that variety and can or freeze the sauce for the winter.  That might be my best bet yet.  I'll try that combination of spices, though.  Thanks again.

 

MK 

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

Max:

 Whole foods here in Omaha has several types of canned San Marzano tomatoes. I always stock up on the Fire Roasted - whole and diced - when I go there. I go maybe once a month...if went every week my grocery budget would be shot!  I'd buy out the store! By the way, the pizza looks delightful. We do have an area in Omaha called "Little Itay" in Omaha around 10th-12th street south of Dodge. I'll try and pinpoint it for you later. They might have some small markets down there. We have a few really good Hispanic markets as well. If you're ever looking for good meats, homemade sausage etc try Stoyisch - amazing!

Happy Monday all..

Trish

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

If you have a membership, look for them in CostCo. The large food service cans are cheap down here in KC, I don't think they'll be higher in Omaha.


For your spaghetti sauce, start with equal portions of crushed tomatoes and tomato puree.


One more shopping at CostCo tip, the Eagle Mills AP flour is $4.82 for 20# down here. It works well in a pizza crust and my starter thrives on the stuff.

Mumsie Leonie's picture
Mumsie Leonie

Right on! You cannot go wrong with San Marzano tomatoes for a taste of the real thing.  I plant and can my own for the year and try to keep my pizza sauce as simple and fresh as possible.  In summer I use them fresh after draining them of alot of their moisture.   I don't use onion in my sauce just olive oil, garlic, greek oregano, dry red peppers, sugar and a little salt.  I've stayed with this one over the years as it always gets great reviews.

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I just bought the Muir Glen fire roasted diced tomatoes because a few people here said it was so good and I just bought Penzeys Tuscan Sunset. Now I'll have a use for them both. Thanks. I showed my husband your pizza photos and he's hoping for pizza like that for tomorrow. I used to use a cooked sauce on my pizza but several of the great pizza makers here said to use the tomatoes right from the can. It made a world of difference. I do use fresh tomatoes in the summer. weavershouse

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

If you search this site, Floyd has a great simple sauce recipe we always use - very garlicky very good!

Trish

browndog's picture
browndog

 Pizza threads always make me hungry, what a couple of beauties.

I agree about the Muir Glen products, but tell me, what is Penzey's Tuscan Sunset?

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

maxamilliankolbe's post about 5 or 6 north of this one mentions that she used this spice on her pizza. She describes it and its ingredients. I just happened to buy it a month ago and I'm going to try it on my pizza too. I grow and dry most of my herbs for the winter but this sounded so interesting I thought I'd give it a go. maxamilliankolbe made some nice pizzas.                                                    weavershouse

maxamilliankolbe's picture
maxamilliankolbe

I have to admit that I am a little partial to Penzeys and the Spice House.  I work part time at Penzeys here in Omaha and so I have access to some wonderful things.  If you have any questions, let me know.  As a side, if anyone is looking for gluten-free spice  products, Penzeys is it.  All of them are gluten-free with the exception of vanilla extract.  It is made with bourban.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Weavershouse, did you find those fire roasted tomatoes at a national source? I've never heard of them but we do have a Trader Joe's and Whole Foods in town and an Italian grocery.

I bought a bottle of Tuscan Sunset the last time I was in Penzies. I haven't tried it on Pizza but it is tasty on Chicken. Penzies natl. HQ is just a few minutes from us so I enjoy browsing in the aroma filled store. There spices are so fresh and reasonable I buy smaller quantities so I have to stop in more often.

Eric

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Eric, in our store they are in the organic aisle and come in various styles ( crushed, diced etc ) and various sizes too. One of my favorite pasta recipes starts with a 28oz can of crushed fire roasted and they really add extra flavor. I thought Muir Glen had been bought out by one of the big companies but the 14 1/2oz can I grabbed from my pantry says they are distributed by Small Planet Foods, Inc. of Sedro-Woolley WA. You could Google them at www.muirglen.com to find out where they sell them in your area. Or call 1-800-832-6345. Can you tell I'm a big fan? A.

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

thanks Annie, I couldn't add anything except that I buy mine in a local health food store. I'm almost sure they are sold across the country.

 

I buy my Penzeys in Minnesota when we're visiting there. I love the aromas when I walk in. A new Penzeys was built here in Ohio but it's about an hour or more away and I haven't been there. I'll wait to go to Minn., it's only 14 hours away :>))  How do you use the Tuscan Sunset with pasta?                                weavershouse

ElbaLiz's picture
ElbaLiz

we are about 30 miles NE of Madison, WI, near Columbus.  This site is fabulous, I don't wnat to go to work!! 

Elba Liz

mkelly27's picture
mkelly27

Well, if you're up to a challenge, ask me sometime or do a google search on "Old Forge Pizza"  I grew up near there and for years have been trying to replicate this pizza.  Now, I can finally say  "I am close to original taste and texture".  It has not been easy. 

______________________________________________________

Two wrongs don't make a right. Three lefts make a right

maxamilliankolbe's picture
maxamilliankolbe

Thanks mkelly27,

 

I'm going to look that up right away.  I'm on a mission... 

mkelly27's picture
mkelly27

New York styles of pizza are easy to make, but we seldom can cook them at the temperatures that bring out the best in the crust flavors, Peter Reinharts dough recipes are very good to work with. He's from the area.(east Pa.)

_______________________________________________________

Two wrongs don't make a right. Three lefts make a right

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Cmon Mike, what's the deal with this style of pizza? There is a lot of buzz about the stuffed white pizza for sure. Do you have a replica recipe you will share? It sounds delicious for a Wisconsin Cheese Head like me. Did I mention-GO PACKERS!

Eric

mkelly27's picture
mkelly27

This guy pretty much nails it.  I'm making one tonight w/broccolli 

 

http://www.stephencooks.com/2005/10/old_forge_white.html 

_______________________________________________________

Two wrongs don't make a right. Three lefts make a right

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Thanks Mike, I did see his post but I don't have a reference for what's right. Do you concur that the cheese should be WI mild white cheddar? Down in the comments there are a few people who sound like they would know who say that's the cheese to use.

When you make it with broccoli do you cook it first in small slices and drain it? Doesn't seem to me like it would cook enough inside the crust sandwich. If you could post a picture of the tray I sure would appreciate it.

I make Spanikopita with Fillo dough, spinach and a cheese combo that would be similar. A meatless bourek.

Eric

mkelly27's picture
mkelly27

I wish I could find a 5# block of some good old american made white cheddar that doesn't cost me $4/lb.  Right now I'm using Muenster and some Monterey Jack mixed in, it's close but not exact.  As far as the broccoli, I chop it small and parboil it till almost soft and plunge it into ice water to stop cooking.  I used to work in a restaurant in Pa. that made excellent white pizza, I wish I paid better attention then.  I'm on dial up at the house so posting a pic is almost painful, but I'll see what I can do.

_______________________________________________________

Two wrongs don't make a right. Three lefts make a right

TableBread's picture
TableBread

Well, I would say that this can go down as a success!  Great job!

 

~TableBread

http://tablebread.blogspot.com

 

ElbaLiz's picture
ElbaLiz

Thanks so much for photos and description.  My husband is from NJ, we're in WI now and pizza like you have described is not possible to find out here!  He would be transported back to Newark/Kearney/W. Orange if I could make him a pizza like you did! 

Thanks again and wonderful photos, congratulations on your first attempt! 

maxamilliankolbe's picture
maxamilliankolbe

I would try making the recipe in Crust and Crumb called Pizza II and roll it out to 1/8" thick.  See what he thinks of it!  Also, where in WI are you from?  I grew up in the UP of Michigan near Marinette, WI.  Boy, do I miss the lake...

ElbaLiz's picture
ElbaLiz

Hi,

We live about 30 miles NE of Madison, outside Columbus.  This website is unbelievable, the info. is endless.  Life in the midwest is good!  Hooked on baking, been hooked on worse things!  I thought I new quite a bit, I'm just a babe!

ElbaLiz 

Brigid's picture
Brigid

Oh, that looks delicious! Your drool warning was a little bit late, though. Should've put it at the top of the post! I'm a big fan of NJ pizza, next time you make pizza II you must get pictures!

 -Brigid 

hullaf's picture
hullaf

 I've recently tried the new WGB pizza crust recipe by Peter Reinhart, the transitional one, and it turned out very well. My husband thought the taste was better than my usual.  

The Muir Glen products are my choice for the sauce, too. Though I've tried more white sauces too (even with all the fat content of cheeses it is so nice and tasty, especially if you use a little pesto as the base.)  Wisconsinite transplant - I always go for the cheeses. (Go Packers!?)

Anet 

maxamilliankolbe's picture
maxamilliankolbe

Thanks Anet for the suggestion.  I have yet to get his other two books, but I spend lots of time at the library frantically copying recipes (always, always much more than I can feasibly make before I have the urge to go back and get more recipes...). 

 

I grew up in the UP on the border of WI and I have family in Green Bay, Appleton, and Madison.  I went to visit family in November and picked up some cheese curds for the ride home.  I tell you, my first bite and beloved little "squeak" gave me such a sense of giddyness I felt like a little kid.  If I try cheese curds anywhere else they just dont do it for me.

localfruitandveg's picture
localfruitandveg

I just started making my own pizzas as well using Peter's recipes from his Apprentice book.  They turn out wonderful!!!  Part of me wishes the dough was a bit sweeter, but it still tastes pretty amazing.  Wonderful pictures!!  And I enjoyed reading all the comments everyone is leaving, I've learned quite a bit about the wonderful world of replicating world-class zah!!!!!!  Way to go!!

Thanks for sharing!!!

 

Localfruit 

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

I'm jonesing for pizza lately and would like to try a few new recipes. Could you share your dough recipes?

Thanks and TGIF!

Trish

okieinalaska's picture
okieinalaska

YUM!  I have got to try this. Looks great. : )

 

Amy in Alaska

localfruitandveg's picture
localfruitandveg

These look EXACTLY like the ones I make!  From the same recipe!  And you're from Omaha like me! Hmmmm....(I had to look and make sure it wasn't ME who posted this)HA!  I agree, this formula makes a great dough, but I, like you, am always looking to perfect it.  I recently went to Whole Foods and had their pizza, it's amazing!  And so simple too.  I think everyone's right, the oven and the temperature have so much to do with it.  So I'm going to make mine up and drive to Whole Foods next time I make pizza, and just ask em to use their oven!!  Hee!!!  Good work!!!!

gildee's picture
gildee

Wow this is a great looking pizza but if u don't mind me saying I have learned to make a banging sourdough pizza crust with pepperoni, mine does not last long enuff for me to take a picture cause I just have to start eating straight out of the oven.


After looking at your pic I now have to make a pizza and maybe I will get a chance to take a pic.


 


Great job


 

shuttervector's picture
shuttervector

Hi, your pizza looks fantastic and I am sooooo jealous. How did you get the large size? Did you roll it or press it with your fingertips? Bye the way, my daughter-in-law is Italian and she makes pizza with just flour, water, and salt and lets it rest two hours and that's it. She presses it into a pan and eccola.

cookbookie's picture
cookbookie

I love the Peter Reinhart recipe also.  To get the hot oven, I put my pizza stone on my gas BBQ and crank it up for about 30 minutes, then I turn it down a little, slide the pizza on and it comes out perfectly without  smoking up your kitchen..  You have to watch because it can burn quickly but you get a great flavor on the crust.

womanbread's picture
womanbread

Mama Mia! If your pizza tastes even a fraction of how amazingly delicious these photos of it look, I'd say you should open up your very own pizzeria! I am a pizza addict (not to be confused with a pizza snob, though, LOL!) and I can tell you just from the photos alone - this is definitely a success. Well done, you!

Aussie Pete's picture
Aussie Pete

Hi Guys,


I hope those pizzas taste as good as the photos look. I was wondering what I was going to do for tea tonight. I now know.


When cooking I always use my KISS system. Keep It Simple Stupid, mainly 'cause I can be(only joking). I am lucky enough to grow my own tomatoes so I make my own pizza sauce from scratch. Again it is so simple. Use either home grown or shop purchased tomatoes.I generally find vine ripened Italian Roma tomatoes the best flavoured. They are plentiful and popular here in Australia. You may have a different name for them in America but they are egg shaped and are popular for canning. The following is a sauce only. What you add after that is up to you. I use it for most of my home Italian dishes where tomatoe sauces are called for.


Recipe


2 large or 3 medium tomatoes does 1 large family size pizza. Or cook a heap, use what you need and freeze till next time.


Chop and dice tomatoes. Heat 1-2 Tbspoons of olive oil in sauspan. Place prepared tomatoes in hot oil and gradually cook down. While the tomatoes are cooking down add crushed garlic(fresh or bottled) ground pepper(optional) and salt to taste. When the tomatoes have cooked down, softened and cooled use a food processor to blend the cooked item turning it into a sauce. A lot of people remove the skin, I don't. I let the processor break it down.  Leave for a couple of hours to cool in fridge and let the flavours develop. No tomato paste is added. Tip.....do not cook garlic in oil before adding the tomato. Add garlic after the tomatoes are under way. There is a richer flavour difference.


You can add herbs if you want but I always use fresh herbs on top when baking our pizza. Hope it works for you.............Peter