The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

How to clean a wicker basket

bshuval's picture
bshuval

How to clean a wicker basket

Hi all,

Today I bought a couple of wicker baskets at a thrift store. I want to use them as brotforms/bannetons (one came lined with linen). My question is how to clean them. I don't know "where they've been", and would rather clean them first. Is washing them in warm sudsy water a good idea? Can I remove the linen off one of the baskets and place in the washing machine?

Thanks,

Boaz 

TableBread's picture
TableBread

I am glad you asked this question.  I see these baskets all the time, sometimes with a liner, sometimes without.  I am always asking myself if they are appropriate for proofing bread.  Some of the proofing baskets that I have looked at online the liner seems to be REALLY thick but the in store basket liners are really THIN so I don't know.

 

~TableBread

http://tablebread.blogspot.com

 

 

Lera's picture
Lera

Hi,

I used to handmake baskets and yes, you can wash them in water with a mild soap--like dish soap and rinse them thoroughly.  Then let them air dry.  I would be aware of any coatings on the basket materials--stains, lacquers, varnish--not good in bread. 

As for the basket cloth lining--depends.  If it is cotton fabric, you can wash and dry it.  If it is linen, you can wash it and them let it air dry.  Or, you can purchase a bit of 100% linen fabric in a neutral color from a fabric store and wash it before using.  Or you could just line it with one of your clean tea towels dusted with flour or wheat bran or such.

I hope this helps.  Lera in Michigan

TableBread's picture
TableBread

I wonder how you could tell what coatings (if any) are on the basket...surely the sales person at Michaels' or Home Depot wouldn't have a clue...

Lera's picture
Lera

Baskets that are a color other than natural--light brown, shiney, very smooth probably have some sort of coating.  Look at the baskets that are sold in this site--they are in their natural state without color or coatings.

Lera in Michigan