The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

what is a problem of using pasteurized milk for fermented breads ?

mukgling's picture
mukgling

what is a problem of using pasteurized milk for fermented breads ?

what is a problem of using pasteurized milk for fermented breads ?

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

pasteurized milk for fermented breads.  Many bakers do recommend scalding milk, whether pasteurized or raw, since standard pasteurization only goes to 161 deg F, which is not hot enough to destroy the glutathion that can contribute to a softer dough and crumb in yeast breads.  Scalding brings the milk up to 180 deg F, which is hot enough to remove that potential issue:

http://bakingbites.com/2015/04/do-i-need-to-scald-milk-for-baking/

Scalding wouldn't be required if using "ultra pasteurized" milk, however:

http://bakingbites.com/2010/09/what-does-ultra-pastruized-mean/

Personally, I use pasteurized milk products in my baking, and rarely bother with scalding.  I often use standard non-fat dry milk powder without scalding, as well (although there are versions that are supposed to be made specifically for baking that don't need to be scalded, but they are way too expensive for my budget).  I haven't detected any "problem" with this, especially since the main reason that I add the dairy is to provide a softer crumb.

Was there a specific issue that you heard about, or were concerned about?

mukgling's picture
mukgling

i read a book 'baking problem solved'

"The adverse effects of inadequately heat-treated milk arise because the globulin proteins normally present have not been denatured.  the globulins can interfere with the stability of the gas  bubbles in the proving dough or baking cake.

(adequately heat-treated milk: 80℃, holding it at that temperature for some 30 minutes before cooling and use)

is that true? or wrong? 

i wonder...

 

thank you for your knowledge and experience

 

 

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

at all indicating that there might be an issue with "globulin proteins" in milk, whether pasteurized or not.  I also don't see in the section that you quoted where the issue is specifically with pasteurized milk, and not with raw.

All that I'm finding is possible issues with the glutathione, which applies to both pasteurized and raw milk, but can be avoided by scalding.  There certainly is no need for 30 minutes of heating - a few seconds at 82 deg C (standard scald) is enough to deactivate the glutathione.

There was a good discussion about it on here a few years back - I'd suggest reading through the comment string starting here or just above here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/comment/68568#comment-68568

Interestingly, glutathione is also naturally present in grains, and can be chemically deactivated by acid - specifically ascorbic acid.  This is why it is recommended as a "dough conditioner" and why you can get higher rise and more open crumb in yeast breads with added ascorbic acid.  There is a quite nice explanation of what the actual "issue" is with glutathione in this article: http://www.chemistryviews.org/details/ezine/4556221/Our_Daily_Bread__Part_3.html

I suspect that the book that you are citing is somewhat dated, and was written before they isolated the glutathione as being the specific cause of milk-related lack of rise and overly soft crumb in yeast breads.  Prior to this discovery, it was commonly known that breads rose higher if milk was scalded first, so most baking books specified that this must be done, even if they didn't specifically know why.

I hope that you find this helpful, and can feel comfortable with using milk in your baking --- and choosing to either do a quick scald to allow for higher rise, or to use without the additional heating to get the softer crumb.  Happy baking!

ann444's picture
ann444

Are you talking about using the milk as the culture?  If so the problem may be pasteurization kills both good and bad bacteria and there are no longer live cultures in the milk to activate the fermentation.  I haven't used milk but have used kombucha and kefir (both unpasteurized) instead of yeast or starter.  Don't know if I would have been able to do it if they were pasteurized.

mukgling's picture
mukgling

i wonder that gluten stability problem for using the PASTEURIZED MILK.

so, not culture. 

minor ingredients for fermented dough for taste, flavor.. etc.

thank you for your expert knowledge!