The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tartine bread Gummy Doughy and under baked.

Combo64's picture
Combo64

Tartine bread Gummy Doughy and under baked.

Has anyone experienced tartine bread coming out Gummy and doughy?

I use a fan forced oven and combo cooker. I baked at 235c fan forced for 25 mins, removed lid and the loaf was quite pale.

I baked for a further 25 mins.

 

The results are this.

(Sorry for external links to images but cant seem to upload here)

https://imgur.com/gallery/OacTK

http://i.imgur.com/Y4via5T.jpg

 

What temps do you guys bake on for a fan forced oven?

 

Thanks.

mutantspace's picture
mutantspace

ive been playing with oven times and have come to this as my best:

bake at 230C covered for 20 - 25 minutes and uncovered for 25 minutes. Then i measure internal temperature and if its around 98+C then its done. I bake at night and dont cut into it until the next morning. If you cut too soon youll end up with a gummy interior. Is that what you're doing -cutting into it too soon?

Combo64's picture
Combo64

It could be that I'm cutting it too soon.

Ill try again in a few hours but those cooking times above are what i cooked mine at.

Or should i remove 20c for fan forced?

I actually found a post last night about someone baking it at 425f for 25 mins then 400f for 30 mins and claimed the gummy doughy texture went.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

a pre-heated oven?

Combo64's picture
Combo64

With a pre heated oven

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

great in fact!  Let the loaf cool and put the cut side down on a plate or something solid to retain mosture while it cools.  

Combo64's picture
Combo64

Its like eating rubber though. Very gummy and not nice at all. Im after a dryer more fluffy crumb.

In the photos it looks normal but even when you roll some between your fingers it turns back to dough. 

 

My thermapen probe even came out with dough on the end.

 

Im now baking a loaf on 220f and then down to 205f 25 mins each then going to jack the temp up to 250 to get a nice dark colour.

 

Ill post results.

Combo64's picture
Combo64

So this loaf was baked at 225c fan forced for 25 mins. The lid was removed and the oven reduced to 205-210c fan forced. Baked further for 25 mins.

 

I didnt need to increase temp to get the crust or colour.

Internal temp was 214f by my thermapen mk3.

The probe came out doughy again but im not going to cut it for 3 hours.

I still dont think i have the crumb im looking for.

http://i.imgur.com/gfAR1Z1.jpg

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

It could be that the hydration is too high for your particular flour.  Try reducing the water.  Flours can vary greatly when used with high %'ages of water.  Start out much lower and with consecutive loaves work up if you can.  Every flour has it's parameters of how much it can absorb and still come out decent.  

Combo64's picture
Combo64

Thanks mini oven. Im currently at 70%. Ill lower back down to 60%

Ill let you know how it goes!

The latest loaf the crumb was very tacky / sticky but not doughy.

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

And it came out well.  Try going to 65% and compare.  

Should that come out too wet, the drop it 2%.

Combo64's picture
Combo64

Actually i just cut the loaf and let it sit for roughly 5 mins. The crumb lost its moisture and tackyness.

Its 95% there!! I think it was tacky because it was still slightly warm. Maybe i need to let it come to complete room temp before cutting.

I wonder if i had baked it for another 5 mins would it of fixed it.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and let it bake another 5.  A famous Loafer once said, " if you think it's done and ready to come out, give it 5 more minutes."    Such wise words....

Yes, a loaf usually takes about 4 hours to cool.  

Wheat sets up faster than rye. Better than half my loaves contain a good measure (more than the half) rye and rye takes about 24 hours to set.  So your waiting is not so long.  :)  

Vince920's picture
Vince920

I just let it cool under a dome-shaped perforated plastic cover and it's fine after a couple of hours. I bake mine for 20 minutes @ 450F then 20-30 minutes @ 400F.

I agree with Mini that hydration might be too much. It happened to me with a 70% hydration bread. Now that I lowered it to around 65%, it's all good.

pall.ecuador's picture
pall.ecuador

My first guess is like the person above said, don't cut into it until it is completely cool. The bread is going to keep cooking and stabilizing. If this doesn't solve it keep baking it a little longer.