The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Over-proofed lemon poppy seed loaf

sadkitchenkid's picture
sadkitchenkid

Over-proofed lemon poppy seed loaf

 

I fermented this guy for about 24 hours total (7hrs on the counter after mixing, 13hrs in the fridge, 4hrs proofing) which I knew was a lot for this batch but it was the only way I could fit it into my schedule. Anyway the smell of the dough and bread is so beyond words amazing. The bread has a great flavor, and though overproofed, the crumb is soft and chewy. 

The second issue was, when I was flipping the bread out of the proofing bowl, onto the hot baking steel, it stuck to the tea towel lining the bowl!!! aaah. Anyway I gently peeled the dough away from the towel, trying not to break the surface. By the time I was done, the dough had flattened and spread out significantly, ruining any good oven spring potential. BUT that is okay I was still left with an amazing loaf. I do plan on remaking this recipe on a weekend where I'm free to give it the treatment it deserves, because the taste really is worth a dough over.

Recipe:

690g Bread flour

560g water

140g starter at 100% hydration 

34g poppy seeds

6g lemon zest (this was about two lemons for me)

17g salt

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Mix the flour with the water, poppy seeds, and lemon zest, and leave for two hours to hydrate. Then fold in the starter and salt.

^mixing in the ingredients minus the salt and starter. Mix until combined, don't knead. Leave for two hours before:

After mixing in the starter, do gentle stretch and folds in the bowl, by stretching up one piece, bringing it down, and stretching it up again, over and over. Do this for about fifteen minutes until the dough smooths out. Set the dough aside for an hour, then start doing stretch and folds once every 30 minutes. I did 8 folds. 

Here was my mistake: I left the dough on the counter for about five hours while I dealt with another dough. Then place it in the refrigerator and took it out the next night after 13 hours. Then let it proof in a very warm place for four hours. Poor guy. Went through so much.

I baked at 500F in a steamed oven for 15 minutes before removing the water in the oven, reducing to 460F and bake for another thirty minutes. 

This bread doesn't have sugar in it so it isn't an inherently sweet bread, but I drizzled some honey onto a slice and it was good as heck.

So again, I will be remaking this and possibly updating the results.

 

Happy baking doods

 

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

If the hydration is over 80% it belongs in a pan or you call it ciabatta.  This one is almost 83% so sticking to the towel would be normal and, with this long a ferment and proof, spreading and little spring would be expected.  It wasn't too far gone to totally collapse when it hit the heat though but it might have if it was in a pan, so the crumb is nice and it has to taste great even though deflated.  I would call it a lemon, poppy ciabatta and claim complete success!

Happy baking 

sadkitchenkid's picture
sadkitchenkid

you're right! I was going to name this ciabatta and act like everything from the rise to the crumb was intentional, but then when I'd mention how I proofed it in a basket, which is very unciabatta-like, people would figure out my scheme haha :) 

Lechem's picture
Lechem

Over proofed or not, what a lovely bread. Definitely something for me to try. Bookmarked! 

stu currie's picture
stu currie

that looks great. I have a ton of starter I need to bring down to a more manageable level, so I fully intend to make this, this weekend. It sounds delicious with the honey on it!

stu currie's picture
stu currie

that looks great. I have a ton of starter I need to bring down to a more manageable level, so I fully intend to make this, this weekend. It sounds delicious with the honey on it!

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Oooh, nice combination! I'll have to try this too. Any reason for the fairly high amount of salt? Or just because? :)

sadkitchenkid's picture
sadkitchenkid

I find that this amount of salt over this amount of dough, isn't too much in my opinion! The bread doesn't come out salty it has a very neutral zesty taste! 

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

That's good (the good taste). In fact, the amount of salt might have helped reduce any possible overproofing, too!