The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Ciabatta No. II

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Wayne-o's picture
Wayne-o

Ciabatta No. II

Hi everyone!

I've been lerking around this site reading and absorbing as much a I possible could. On Thanksgiving weekend I went to King Arthur Flour in Vermont and spent about $300.00 on flour and equipment. One of the things I bought was a video on Artisan Bread Baking by Michael Jabinsky. I gotta say that the tape was worth all of the 15 or so dollars I paid for it. It was excellent instruction on Artisan Bread baking. It gave me both the confidence and knowledge to attempt once again to make a ciabatta.

I used Peter Reinhart's recipe that was in his book "The Bread Bakers Apprentice". I made a poolish version. I varied the hydration of the total recipe from 72% to just over 78%. The poolish was preparded the night before at around 7:00pm. I took it out of the refrigerator at 6:30am the next morning and let it come up to room temperature for about an hour and a half. Then began combining the ingredients.

The first thing I did was weigh out 7.5 oz. of spring water and put in the microwave for 40 seconds to bring it up to about 100 degrees F. I added one and a half teaspoons of dry instant yeast (not dry active yeast) to the water and let it sit for 15 or so minutes. I then added the water and yeast mixture to the container that had the poolish in it. I poured it around the edges to free up the poolish from the sides and bottom of the container.

I got the Kitchen Aid (KA) ready with the paddle attachment and put the poolish mixture into the KA mixing bowl. I turned it on to low speed and let it go until the poolish had given way to a creamy consistancy (about 10 or so minutes) and added one and three quarter tsp of salt and let it mix for 5 minutes. I then began to add 13.5 oz (3 cups) of bread flour 1/4 cup at a time slowly making sure that the 1/4 cup of flour was completely incorporated into the mixture before adding another. The closer I got to having added all of the flour the more slowly I added the flour.

The dough never cleared the side of the mixing bowl. After I felt as though everything was homogeneous, I pulled the dough out of the mixing bowl and onto the well floured  counter using a spatchula. I kneaded it for about three minutes using the wet dough technique (drop and flop) of lifting the dough up and letting gravity stretch it for a bit then flopping it down and forward over itself. Lift and rotate the dough a quarter turn and do the gravity stretch thing again. Repeat for about three minutes or so constantly wetting you hands in the bowl of ice water you have at your kneading station to help keeping the dough from sticking to your fingers.

After kneading I let it ferment for 45 minutes at 75 degrees F.

Then I did the double fold twice at 45 minute intervals. 

Then I shaped the ciabatta and proofed.

 

 Here's a shot of the ciabatta after proofing for 45 minutes

Here's a shot just after it came out of the oven.

It's cooling now so I can't give a picture of the crumb yet but will after it cools.

Here's a picture of the crumb

Here's another picture of the crumb a few slices deeper into the loaf

Wayne-o 

cordel's picture
cordel

That looks really good, Wayne. I am probably at least a month away from attempting ciabatta, but I will come back here for inspiration. How was the crumb, once it cooled?

parousia's picture
parousia


 so beautiful that i must go eat some more bread imediately

Wayne-o's picture
Wayne-o

I guess I'm pretty freaking happy with my efforts. The deeper I sliced into this loaf, the more impressed I became. It was really awesome listening to the bread crackle as it was cooling.

Wayne-o's picture
Wayne-o

thanks peeps :)

cordel's picture
cordel

That is just beautiful, Wayne.

Wayne-o's picture
Wayne-o

Bread baking is certianly an art form when it gets to this level. And learning the strokes of the artists before you is a persuit that should or could be never ending....

Thanks for your compiments....we're always learning!:)

Wayne-o 

 

Digger57's picture
Digger57

The Great use of grains is bread making. OH YA!!

WOW That looks great I will be trying one next week the same way you did yours and see how it does. I hope I can get the same results as you or at least close. Have a wonderful Holiday season. Digger