The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Honey replacement for sugar?

amateur4sure's picture
amateur4sure

Honey replacement for sugar?

I've found a recipe online for oatmeal raisin cookies, that I've baked before and really like. The recipe calls for 1 cup dark brown sugar & 1/4 cup granulated sugar. Can I use honey to substitute for the sugars and do I have to alter any of the other liquid ingredients.....if any?

cgmeyer2's picture
cgmeyer2

you need to decrease the amount of sugar by 25% when using honey or any other liquid sweetner in any recipe. you can also add dry milk to balance out the recipe. i've done this with bread and other baked goods.

claudia

amateur4sure's picture
amateur4sure

Thanks Claudia for the helpful info. Have a great day:).

cgmeyer2's picture
cgmeyer2

after i reread my comment, i realized i may not have stated it correctly. When using a liquid substitute such as honey, agave or maple syrup use 25% less; 3/4 c. honey instead of 1 c. sugar. These liquid sweeteners have sweeter than sugar. if the recipe calls for dark brown sugar, i would probably add ~ 1/4 c - 1/3 c. brown sugar because it does aid in browning & texture. i have a cookie recipe that calls for 3/4 c. each brown & white sugar. i reduced the brown to 1/3 c. & substituted 1/2 c. honey for the white sugar. i also added 1/4 c nonfat dry milk to compensate for the added liquid & reduction in sugar. My husband loves it and it is still sweet just not as sweet as the original. You need to be careful not to alter baked goods too drastically since it changes the chemistry of the product.

Hope this clarifies it better.

Happy baking,

Claudia

cgmeyer2's picture
cgmeyer2

After reading my previous comment, I realized I may not have stated it clearly. When substituting liquid sweeteners for sugars, you can successfully reduce the amount by 25%; ex = 3/4 c honey for 1 c sugar. Liquid sweeteners such as honey, agave, & maple syrup are more intense and sweeter than sugar. I also add ~ 1/4 c nonfat dry milk for added protein and to compensate for the increase in liquid and decrease in dry ingredients. If a recipe calls for brown sugar, I usually retain 1/4 - 1/3 c. since it helps in browning & texture of the finished product.
I have adapted a chocolate chip cookie recipe successfully using this method. My husband likes it better than the original. If the recipe is changed to drastically it may alter the chemistry of the finished baked good.
I hope this clarifies my previous comment.
Happy baking,
Claudia

amateur4sure's picture
amateur4sure

Yes, It does. You're so kind for taking the time to rewrite. Makes more sense now. It is people like you who make this world more manageable. Happy baking to you also and God bless.