The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough pizza experiment

Vtg79's picture
Vtg79

Sourdough pizza experiment

Newbie question, I have this almost 1month old starter which is fed every 24 hrs at 1:2:2. Now to test my starter (which floats in water, is yeasty) I decided to make a very small portion of pizza with following proportions (loosely based on some beginner recipes I read about on the net).

I started with equal quantities (in weight) of starter and flour.

110g Starter + 110g Flour mix (WWF+APF)

Mixed above, rested and added olive oil n salt n seasoning, kneaded it for some time incorporating a little hot water to form a smooth dough. I am guessing that with all the liquid I added the final dough would have been around 50-55% hydration.

I baked one portion right away after a 30 min rest period (it was more of a cracker consistency) and let another portion rest in the refrigerator for around 24 hours, removed and rolled out, topped and baked at 200°C for 15 min.

The second portion (pictured) had risen well in the refrigerator and there was a better spring in the crust with a few holes. The only problem is the rise in the oven was not so gr8, did I underbake it or is it sourdough?... It was not fluffy as I would like it (or as achieved with commercial yeast)

What could I have done differently and what is it about baking sourdough baking that needs different treatment?

isand66's picture
isand66

It definitely looks like the dough did not ferment properly.  If you want you can follow my simple SD recipe and method below:

Levain: 56 grams starter (mine is at 66% hydration), 175 Grams AP, 50 Grams (Spelt or Whole Wheat or Rye), 141 grams water.

Mix levain and let sit at room temperature for 6-7 hours.

Main Dough:

366 grams 00 Flour or AP flour

55 grams Whole Wheat

263 Water (adjust up or down depending on your flour)

14 grams sea salt

28 grams Honey or sugar

28 grams olive oil

Mix the flours with all the water except around 100 grams and let it autolyse for 30-60 minutes or longer.

Mix in the starter, rest of the water and other ingredients and mix on low or by hand for 6 minutes (10 minutes if by hand).

You should have a soft and silky dough.

Let it sit at room temperature, 70 - 72 degrees with 2-3 sets of Stretch and folds 15-25 minutes apart for a total of 1.5 - 2 hours.  Divide the dough into 5 balls and place in small plastic bags with 1 TBS of olive oil in each bag.  Put it in the refrigerator overnight.  When ready to bake, let the dough come to room temperature for at least 1 hour.  Dip each ball in some flour and shape, top and bake at your highest temperature.

I hope this helps.  Let me know if you have any questions if you want to try this.

 

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

Increased the hydration to at least 65%, allowed the dough to double then bake one straight away and refrigerate the other for a day or two. 

Try not to pour hot water onto the dough. In a big dough you aren't going to kill off all the starter but not good practice. 

When ready roll out the base and with a fork prick the dough leaving a rim. Par bake for 10 minutes, take out the oven and add the topping then finish off back in the oven. 

Jean - DelightfulRepast.com's picture
Jean - Delightf...

I make two loaves of sourdough every week (and other breads in between) and so one day I decided I'd try sourdough pizza crust instead of the yeast crust I developed years ago. The sourdough crust came out great, but we just didn't like it as much as my regular pizza crust. I think the sourdough flavor detracts from the flavors of the sauce and toppings.

Jean - DelightfulRepast.com's picture
Jean - Delightf...

I make two loaves of sourdough every week (and other breads in between) and so one day I decided I'd try sourdough pizza crust instead of the yeast crust I developed years ago. The sourdough crust came out great, but we just didn't like it as much as my regular pizza crust. I think the sourdough flavor detracts from the flavors of the sauce and toppings.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

or a focaccia and it looks to be under baked since no browning top or bottom.  When you have  a thick pan dough you want to let iot rise before topping.  I find SD pizza dough to be best after 24-48 hours in the fridge after rising 30% during bulk ferment on the counter, but like it paper thin except fo the rim and very crispy - no folding allowed:-) A bit if EVOO and sugar helps the crust brown well during the short, very hot bake.   550 F baked on a stone for 10 minutes and everything is nicely brown top and bottom.

There are a lot of SD pizza recipes on this site - just use the search button.

Happy pizza making

AndrewT's picture
AndrewT

How much salt did you add? The ratio of salt is important.