The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Need help from Italian cookie experts

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Need help from Italian cookie experts

25? years ago I had a wonderful biscotti di ________? at a museum cafe in San Francisco.  I used to carry the name in my wallet, and looked in many Italian cookbooks to no avail.  I'm pretty sure the now-missing word was the name of a town/region, but I've forgotten it.  It was a flat rectangle - like a granola bar), but seemed twice-baked (maybe first as a bar cookie), then cut, separated and baked again.  I know it had oatmeal and almonds, and maybe a little cinnamon.  I presume it was supplied from one of the Italian bakeries in SF.  Should have asked at the cafe, but my small kids were ready to move on with activities.  I guess I can tinker, but would love to know if there's a true biscotti of this style and flavor so I can hunt down a recipe.  Thanks!

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

Montb - you just described a typical biscotti. They are typically twice baked, shaped that way, have some almonds or typical nuts, etc.. I'd suggest you find a basic recipe and then make it to your memory.. you'll be surprised how easy it is! Enjoy..

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Dear bread - love your username (wish I could claim 1965, but am a bit older than you).  I've baked biscotti for years.  The sudden memory of these was prompted by receiving another biscotti cookbook in mail.  I wondered if these were unique to a region because they were very flat (think Nature Valley cruncy granola bar - 2 per envelope) and rectangle shape.

I'll play with it sometime after the holidays, maybe just reduce the leavening and bake in a 11x7 or 9x13.  Thanks! 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

 

cut up and then the slices baked again.  Not a complicated procedure but an electric slicer helps.  First bake light in shiny pans, then let them stand overnight so the nuts cut easier and the crust dries a little bit.  Then slice and spread out and bake again at low temps until light to golden and dried out crispy.     

These above were made with hazel nuts and name translates to "corn plasters."    (like bandages for calluses)