The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Amazing Skills Shaping And Kneading Dough

Anonymous baker's picture
Anonymous baker (not verified)

Amazing Skills Shaping And Kneading Dough

I'm personally adopting the Japanese method at the very beginning of the video...

Amazing skills shaping and kneading dough










drogon's picture
drogon

The first one reminds me of making Pain Brie - where the dough is quite stiff and best kneaded by hitting it repeatedly with a large rolling pin...

Also the croissant one at the end is Julian Picamil who runs a French Boulangerie (well he would because he's French!) not that far from me - Saveurs in Dartmouth - just opened a new shop in Totnes too. See more of his antics here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L36OiPWmOL4

-Gordon

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

And here I was feeling smug for being able to shape a round loaf of bread. They make me feel awfully clumsy! That must be some seriously good flour, to make those wonderfully stretchy flat breads and be able to throw them around like that without tearing.

Thanks for sharing!

hreik's picture
hreik

I was fearful for the dough shaper's hands in the Japanese part. 

hester

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Samauri swords!  I love 2' fer kitchen gadgets........ got to get one of those hammers

FueledByCoffee's picture
FueledByCoffee

FYI - I believe the one guy doing the silly pizza tricks is actually using a fake piece of dough.  They have pizza tossing competitions where they use these kinda silicone feeling rubber pizzas for doing tricks...pretty sure that's what he's using in order to do all those moves without the dough tearing. 

certainly some pretty awesome skills displayed throughout the video.  Really cool to see the traditional techniques being carried on and passed down.

BobBoule's picture
BobBoule

start a dough hammering club so we can help each other hammer our dough. It would probably be good exercise as well.

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

And therapeutic to-boot. I'd love to hammer a dough but I dread to think what happens while you perfect this technique.

BobBoule's picture
BobBoule

There is no such thing as perfection, its all an illusion! ROFLOL

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

first 10-30 minutes when making a SD then no harm no foul and the bread would come out fine after taking that pounding :-)

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Yes, I've always wanted to try Pain Brie, where I can take my frustrations out on a lump of dough instead of handling it so very gently as most recipes seem to require. Richard Bertinet has a recipe for it in Crust, and there's a video (though not a very good one) here. Perhaps we should all try it (dabrownman, you can try two hammers if that works better for you!) and see how it makes us feel!

flux's picture
flux

I'm not sure the first couple of flat breads were chapati, but instead something called roomali roti.

Every so often I watch bread making in other parts of the world on youtube. Lately I've been watching women making struedel, lavash, phyllo with ancient equipment taking small lumps of dough and stretching them into impossibly sized disks. Wishing I had those kind of mad skills as I finally break down and try doing it myself. I'd love to have a tandoor/tandir and a place for a wood fired tava or saj for naan and jufka in the back yard.

hreik's picture
hreik

He shrugged and said, "oh yeah, my parents did this!".  I asked about the fingers of the shaper being slaughtered by the mallet.  He said, "oh no, they are a team, they know what to do!"... so interesting.

hester

_vk's picture
_vk

I was most impressed by the Chinese noodles making.