The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Cinnamon Raisin Walnut bread

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Bart's picture
Bart

Cinnamon Raisin Walnut bread

I know that this one is posted before, but this is the first loaf I made from the Peter Reinhart book and it was a real pleasure!  The taste is also great!  I never had a slice of bread that had cinnamon in it.  I once did eat a cinnamon roll while on a trip in the States.  Over here in Belgium I have never seen this kind of bread.  Usually over here they put cinnamon in cookies (speculaas, which you all should try!) But like I said, I never had it over here.  If it exists I have no knowledge about it.

So I hope you guys enjoy the pics.  I just enjoyed several slices ;-)

  

leemid's picture
leemid

Which Peter Reinhart book?

Bart's picture
Bart

The PR book :

The Bread Baker's Apprentice: Mastering the Art of Extraordinary Bread

If you need the recipe, let me know, I could post it if you want to.

swee's picture
swee

Hi Bart,

 

I read with interest of your Cinnamon Raisin Walnut bread. Could you post the recipe (English)?

 

Thanks,

theavidbaker's picture
theavidbaker

Oh, yes.  I made this as well.  I went without the swirl this time.  Typically, I make the Baking Illustrated's Cinnamon Swirl Bread but that one uses a richer dough and is more involved.  However Peter's bread is a perfect daily loaf to make sandwiches with or toast for a quick snack.  It also makes for great stuffed French toast!  Lastly, you could always use stales pieces to make bread pudding into.  It makes two loaves.  After they both cool completely, I always freeze one for later in freezer lock bags.  The other one can stay out on the countertop for 3-4 days in a cool dry spot wrapped well in plastic wrap.


Some of my baking notes: I always toast the walnuts to bring out their flavour. (12 minutes, 350F.  Let them cool completely before adding them to the dough).  They also remain crunchy in the bread.  For the raisins, if they feel dry and stale, add some boiling water to plump them up.  At this point, I add vanilla extract to give it another layer of flavour.  I drain (and save) the water, then dry the raisins thoroughly before adding them to the dough.  I use the flavoured water for making other breads or cakes with.


Cheers!


http://theavidbaker.wordpress.com

staff of life's picture
staff of life

If you like cranberries, you must try the Cranberry Walnut bread.  I'm making several in time for Thanksgiving on Thursday. It's fantastic.  I never braid it; there are too many cranberries to make it easy to braid, but it works well as a sandwich bread, too.

SOL

Bart's picture
Bart

 Check my posting on my blog. 

I made this one too :

 

ilovebread blog 

 

This one is indeed a very tasty bread too!   I love it!

 

 

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Could you supply us with a genuine speculaas recipe please. The recipe I have is nice but it came from a wonan's mag from down under, so it may have been modified to suit Antipodean tastes!

Oh yes, and the loaf is very more-ish and delicate.M

Bart's picture
Bart

Sure Maggie!  Here's the recipe from my school book :

 

900 gram flour

600 gram cassonade (brown sugar : http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassonade)

 I apologize, but I don't know the correct translation for this.

300 gram butter (room temperature)

100 gram water

10 gram ground cinnamon

10 gram baking soda

1 egg 

Preparation :

Sift the flour, cinnamon, and baking soda  

Mix the butter and sugar

Add the egg to the above mixture.

Add the flour to the above mixture.

 

Cool in the fridge for 24 hours.

(you can also add some almond flakes)

 

If you don't have a speculaas mold 

http://www.hollandsbest.com/housewares/speculaas_molds.php 

Using the rolling pin, roll the dough 0,5 centimeter thick and cut out some figurines.

 

Bake 335°F for about 15 minutes.

Hope this helps, there might be better recipes, but this one we learned in school back in the mid eighties  

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Cassonade looks like what we call raw sugar (wish my French was better) which is probably white sugar mixed with a brown syrup here. I'll use a speculaas spice mix but the baking soda will make all the difference to the product. M

Bart's picture
Bart

Maggie, great  to hear you have speculaas mix available over there. 

Good luck!  Post some pics when you have baked them.

 

browndog's picture
browndog

Gosh it's so festive around here! Bart, I'm not even fond of raisins, but this looks delicious.

That is very interesting to learn that you've managed to live however long without cinnamon bread. In the U.S. at least, many of us grew up eating toast sprinkled with cinnamon sugar for breakfast or for snacks.

Bart's picture
Bart

Browndog, thanks for the info.  I find it very interesting to learn this.  I should try toast with cinnamon sugar, guess I will like that too.

I am planning on making the walnut-raisin cinnamon loaf on a regular basis now.  My wife also likes it a lot, it has a better tast than plain raisin bread I think.  This bread will be on the menu for upcoming Christmas, that is for sure!  Any other suggestions I should try? 

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hello Bart,
When i have previously made speculaas I have used a Dutch speculaas spice mix recipe which includes cinnamon, mixed spice, ginger and cardamom. This mixture gives the biscuits a unique flavour. My recipe didn't have any raising agent which I had thought might have been the Dutch way of baking them, but the addition of baking soda, as in [your recipe, will improve them a lot. When I have made them before I have drizzled a runny icing over them flavoured with vanilla and cinnamon oil. M

Bart's picture
Bart

Hi Maggie,

 

In every speculaas recipe there is a raising agent.  I know there are recipes that use a mix of baking powder and a raising agent called 'alkali'.  I don't know the correct translation of that word.

Also in every speculaas recipe there is either a mixture of spices (like the one you have) or only cinnamon is used in some recipes.  

Where did you get the speculaas spices mix?  Did you get it on line?  I did not mention it in my first reply because I was thinking you would not be able to get it in the States.

Speculaas is delicious, dipped in tea or coffee it is one of my favorite cookies! 

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hello Bart,
Actually i'm in New Zealand. Alkali would be translated as baking soda here (sodium bicarbonate). I make my own spice mix because in no way would you find such here. I have several recipes for speculaas spice mixes but the one with cardamom is my favourite. The recipe sources were Australian and it mystfies me that in each recipe there was no mention of a raising agent. I used a cookie cutter rather than a mould. i'll give them another go now that I know they are meant to have a raising agent in them. M

Bart's picture
Bart

... the translation Maggie.  I make speculaas either with a mold or also with a cookie cutter.  Great to hear you make your own spice mix.  We over here can just buy it in the store.  I am trying to get the same taste, structure than some of the commercial speculaas found over here.  Until now I am not able to reproduce the same taste-flavor-structure.  I guess the spice mix is the big secret for getting a great result. 

Oh by the way, in Brussels there is this very old cookies store that makes great speculaas.  If I happen to be in Brussels, I always buy some.  I will make sure I have my camera with me next time I go there and post some on my blog.  I will let you know.

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Bart.

PR's cinnamon, raisin, walnut bread is about the only straight dough bread I bake. My wife loves it so much, she has even made it herself! (The only bread she's baked in the past 30 years.)

I know that shop in Brussels! It's the one with a big display of antique speculaas forms, including some that are hundreds of years old, right? About 20-30 meters off the main square. Some of the forms are immense! I may have some photos of the shop.

Thanks for the recipe. I'm going to try these without forms, because I don't have any. It will be a big surprise for my wife, who loves them.


David

Bart's picture
Bart

Yes David,

in that shop you cand see antique speculaas forms, and indeed, some of them are very, very old!

Well yeah, you could make these without a form using a rolling pin.  I should try that too.

To be honest, I buy too much speculoos here in the grocery store, and eat it way too much.

But I love the taste so much, it is hard to resist :-)

 

Bart

ilovebreadblog

 

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Oh Bart !,
I haven't made any speculaas up til now as i previously indicated, but with my cafe in low gear, being winter/spring, I intend to try your recipe this week. I have to use a cookie cutter as I have no knowledge about the 'forms'[ you and David use. I have some sort of "op art" cookie cutters which give the speculaas ( as tried before with a different recipe) an eye-catching appeal (which is necessary for some of my rather conservative customers).
I guess the flavour of the spices I use over here would not compare with what you are familiar with, but for New Zealanders (I hate the word 'Kiwis' as the birds are diminishing in numbers) the combination is more exotic than what is usually used in baking here. M

Bart's picture
Bart

That is great Maggie, make sure to post some pics.

I apologize for not replying sooner, I haven't been on this forums much lately and it has been a long time since I updated my blog.  I still do bake on a regular basis though and will keep on doing this.

Bart

 

ilovebreadblog

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hi Bart.,
Yes, I made speculaas for the cafe using the strange shaped cutters I had and we finished them off with thin multiple stripes of piped chocolate and white icing flavoured with vanilla and cinnamon oil. My customers were a bit wary of them at first (probably because of the Dutch spelling) but they (the speculaas) went in the end. The biscuits looked beautiful. Sorry no photo yet to put up - I have not yet mastered that skill; being a child of the 40's and technophobic- but will get my son to show me some time soon! M