The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Golden Quinoa Struan

umbreadman's picture
umbreadman

Golden Quinoa Struan

I just pulled my Quinoa Struan out of the oven a little while ago, and I'm rather pleased with the results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I used reinhart's multigrain struan formula and used 6ozs of cooked quinoa in the overnight soaker. I also used Heartland Mill Golden Buffalo flour, which I'm playing aroudn with. I've used "Gold 'n' White" flour before (a high-extraction flour, meaning the coarse bran sifted out of whole wheat flour), and I was pleased with it, so I ordered 25 lbs of this to see how it performed. So far so good i think. Since it called for a substantial amount of yeast to be added for the final proof, I think it rose rather quickly, and was probably ready before I made it back home. I had to reform it and considered letting it proof a second time, but I thought it might become a mess if the yeasts were given too much free reign.

I haven't tasted this loaf yet (it wasn't done cooling), but it smells great. It looks like it would be great for sandwiches or toast. I was intrigued when it called for milk in the soaker, and I wonder how that will impact the bread.

Comments

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I would be too. The crumb looks so creamy and the bread rose so high. Let us know how it tasted. It looks delicious.     weavershouse

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

It must be cooled by now...

Mini O

umbreadman's picture
umbreadman

It was really good. There was just a hint of sweetness from the honey i put in there, and the rest was just a creamy, light wheatyness with just a touch of quinoa taste (which is kinda bland/subtle in its own right, but it stood out from the wheat). The crust was nice and crunchy, and stayed that way for quite a while, i was immpressed. It didn't last 24 hours in my house. And it was really good with regular / peanut butter, as well as plain.

I would definitely recommend this one and using quinoa in bread in general. If you cook it before hand, it mixes in wonderfully with the dough and adds a really interesting textured appearance to the crust from all the little 'tails' on each grain. This is all aside from the fact that its really good for you and is a complete protein, which is part of the reason i used it since there are a lot of vegetarians in my house. I want to try adding amaranth grains to a loaf, since it is a complete protein as well and would probably blend in since its so small...