The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

major wheat growing regions in the US - reference maps

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

major wheat growing regions in the US - reference maps

Maps of the US showing the major wheat growing regions. For those of us who must mail order, at least it can explain those shipping costs.


Every map has a link immediately below if you need to see it in a larger size.


As I am geographically challenged, I start with a basic US map that shows the states with their names.


US Reference Map

click here for large size version

Major US Regions for All Wheat

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Major US Regions for Spring Wheat

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Major US Regions for Winter Wheat

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Major US Regions for Durum Wheat

click here for large size version

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Interesting that white and durum wheats are grown in such a narrow area.  Also that eastern wheats are primarily soft - which partially explains the White Lily Flour and fabulous southern biscuits!

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

I would *kill* for a few 5-pound bags of White Lily Flour

All-purpose flours available in local supermarkets in my geographical area (NE USA) are a blend of hard red winter wheats.

White Lily is made from a blend of *soft* red winter wheats. As you mention, great for biscuits and also for pastry.

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Have you ever tried this?  It's protein content is only 7.12%.  I don't think they sell a flour this soft that isn't self-rising.

I haven't tried it myself, which is probably good.  I don't need to eat that many biscuits!

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

...unfortunately not good for pastry dough

I don't buy self-rising flour - I understand the convenience of having the rising agent premixed, but I prefer to buy a low gluten flour without that. If the recipe calls for baking powder / baking soda, I can always add it.

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

I've never bought self-rising either.  But I bet this makes fabulous biscuits.  One of these days maybe I'll have a mill, and grind my own soft white wheat.  I'm a bit hesitant because I suspect that I really shouldn't be eating so much wheat - or other grains for that matter.  I told myself I'd avoid wheat and dairy altogether for a week and see how I felt before I bought a mill.  I just never want to do it THIS WEEK!  Chances are fairly good that I won't cut out wheat anyway, so I may as well eat the good stuff - i.e. homemade.  Yep, I can rationalize with the best of them!

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

I asked KAF if they carried any other flours with as low a protein count.  Here's their reply.  I have some of the Italian flour, but I'm saving it for pizza. I also have some other brand of cake flour that I've been tempted to use for biscuits  - but these days I bake too much bread to have room for biscuits.

 

Dear Baking Friend,

Thank you for contacting us. That is a very good question; the self
rising flour has a gluten content of 7.12 and the closest flour in the
unbleached variety would be the Italian Style flour at 8.5 percent. The
absolute closest is the Queen Guinevere cake flour at 8.0% but this is
our only bleached flour. The item number for the Italian style flour is
3338 and it comes in 3lb bags. Unfortunately this is a catalogue only
item at this time. I hope this was helpful, please don't hesitate to
contact us again with any further questions.

Happy Baking!
Jessica
The Bakers Catalogue
(802)649-3717
Bakers@kingarthurflour.com

 

staff of life's picture
staff of life

Your comment, Subfuscpersona, made me chuckle a bit.  I live in the south, and all the grocery stores are stocked with White Lily flour.  Trying to find something as exotic as rye though can be, well, very trying.

SOL