The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Whole Wheat Kamut Sourdough

isand66's picture
isand66

Whole Wheat Kamut Sourdough

   I wanted to use some fresh milled flour from my Mock Mill that I'm testing out so I through together a simple bread using fresh milled whole wheat, fresh milled Kamut and some barley flakes.

I do have to say I'm very impressed with the control you get with the Mock Mill.  I used the second finest settings and did one sift and reground the sifted out parts again.

The end result was a very tasty wholesome bread with a moderate crumb.

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Formula  (NOTE: THESE HAVE BEEN UPDATED.  I removed the extra AP flour in final dough)

Whole Wheat Kamut Bread (%)

Whole Wheat Kamut Bread (weights)

 

Download the BreadStorm File Here.

 

 

 

 

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Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.  Use immediately or refrigerate for up to 2 days.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, barley flakes and 400 grams of the water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 60 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), olive oil and balance of the water, and mix on low for 6 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (If you have a proofer you can set it to 80 degrees and follow above steps but you should be finished in 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 210 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We wouldn't never think of doing a 60% whole grain bread at 60% hydration.  That crumb is pretty amazing too for such a dry concoction.  That crust is pretty nice looking with the fancy scoring too.  This one has to be tasty and will make a fine sandwich bread for sure.  Very nice indeed!

Lucy sends her best to the cool part of pack on the East Coast.  Still hot as heck here but monsoon is on the way so we can be hot,,,,,, and humid:-) 

Happy Baking Ian

isand66's picture
isand66

Something is wrong with the formula.  I forgot to change the AP flour in the main out!  It is certainly not a low hydration dough.  I corrected it this morning.  It's over 85% hydration :).

Thanks for pointing that out.  Sorry to hear your still roasting out by you.  Your pool must be like a hot tub!

We are lucky and its only been in the high 70s and low 80s.

The east coast gang wishes Lucy well.

Happy baking.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

so far.  In the mornings the water is still relatively cool since it gets down to 88 F at night but it get up to 92 F in the afternoon pretty easy.  In another 2 weeks the pool will hit 96 F in the afternoon if monsoon does;lt come by then - its like wearing a really big, thick, hot skin.

 

Ru007's picture
Ru007

This one looks very good!

I'm making my way into whole grain territory slowly. Whole grain bread tends to get a bap rap so its nice to see how successful one can be.

Great job! 

Happy baking :)

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Ru.  Glad you like the bread and hope you make the leap to whole grains soon.  It is best to ease into it and maybe use 15% at first.  The best method is to let the flours autolyse for at least 1 hour or longer which will help get rid of the sometimes bitter taste of whole grains and also really allow the flour to absorb the liquid.

Feel free to ask any questions when you are ready.

Regards,
Ian

Ru007's picture
Ru007

I'll definitely take you up on your offer for advice, i could use it! 

Happy baking :)

STUinlouisa's picture
STUinlouisa

Sometimes simple is best as your loaf proves. That crumb looks excellent. I wondered about the Mock Mill, pretty sure it uses the same stones as my KoMo which continues to impress after more than a years use. I often double or triple grind the sifted out bits to raise the extraction % or to just make the bran smaller.

Stu

isand66's picture
isand66

The aroma of this one was fantastic.  The taste and smell of freshly ground flour is amazing.  You are right that the Mock Mill is made by the original inventor of the KoMo in Germany.  I was given one to test and I have to say I won't be using my my Nutramill anytime soon.  I was going to save up and by a Komo, but to be honest I think the Mock Mill is more than sufficient for my home baking needs.

I only did one sift this time but will do another using my finer drum sifter next time to get a real high extraction flour.

Regards,
Ian

PalwithnoovenP's picture
PalwithnoovenP

This still looks tasty and delectable. The crumb looks very nice for a bread high in whole grains. Well done!

PS: I still can't move on from your great rolls last week.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for your kind words!

You would like this one for sure.  The crumb was nice and moist and open and tasty.

Glad you liked my rolls so much.  I actually baked up another more lean recipe this morning that I will post sometime this week and I think you will like those as well.

Look forward to your next post.

Regards,

Ian

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

We have really been enjoying homemade sauerkraut on the durum whey  rye with corned beef and swiss. This loaf looks great. I still have a fair amount of ground flour so haven't pursued the mill attachment. I am moving Aug1 for a year to a small apt. so not sure what will happen with the bread baking ! Since I can't imagine eating store bought and there are no local bakeries where we are going  I will have to cont. in some form just to survive :)  May try to sell some at their local farmer's market or trade for produce which would be even better . c

isand66's picture
isand66

Your sandwiches sound awesome and I'm glad I was able to inspire you to bake your own version.  If you do decide to get an attachment mill, the Mock Mill is well worth it.

I hope your new temporary digs give you enough space to do some baking.  I can't imagine you can stay away that long :).  Let us know how it goes especially if you end up doing something at the Farmer's market.

Regards,
Ian

Yippee's picture
Yippee

You've got so many lovely ornaments! I can imagine how relaxing it is to enjoy your bread in your garden, while looking at all the beautiful flowers and decors.  Home sweet home!  You (and DBM) seem to have endless new ideas of  wholesome, delicious loaves.  Very inspiring post!   Thanks for sharing!

Happy Baking

Yippee

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Yippee.  The Buddha head was my wife's latest idea.  One of the succulents she planted will grow "beads" so it should like pretty cool after it grows a bit. It's a lot of work to keep up and I'm constantly changing things when they don't work but it's rewarding.

Glad you like the bread and the post and look forward to your next bake as well!

Regards,
Ian