The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

new password vs. current password

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fertileprayers's picture
fertileprayers

new password vs. current password

When I read about changing my password this morning, I kept expecting to sign in by repeating the old password twice (like all automatic pilots do) and then brought to a page where I sign in my new password twice--but oddly, having a password that has 10 letters of odd caps and including two vowels only made me wonder if I were in 9th grade typing class again. It didn't help to be told to place a new password in the second box, when the old one was only 4 minutes old! A four minutes in existence password isn't old enough to be called old! Maybe former?

 

I am going to be asking people to discover kudzu and Juanita Baldwin who has explored the nutritional benefits of kudzu with labs and explore making breads with kudzu. This is important because of the protein and flavonoid content, fiber, as well as being a famine food. For anyone who knows a Great Depression survivor who didn't live on a farm, there will be no argument about this path I am exploring.

 

I have made yeast bread once in my life (not including the beer bread) and ducks wouldn't couldn't shouldn't eat it. A year wouldn't disintigrate it in Jacksonville, Florida in the front yard during rain, snow (1989 it snowed on Christmas Eve) and other weather.

 

 //kudzus.blogspot.com Kudzu Kwestions Charlotte:     http://kudzus.blogspot.com

 

 

 

 

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

This is a site for and by amateur artisan bakers. If you aren't a baker and aren't terribly interesting in baking, then this may not be the place for you. Thread-jacking with off-topic dietary advice is not constructive and is not tolerated here.

fertileprayers's picture
fertileprayers

Tell me what thread jacking is, please?

I am an amateur baker and an artisan enthusiast. I am even wearing a beret in my picture. 

I am civil and I am not insulting anyone and do not expect to be insulted. To introduce my insterest in an ingredient that is mentioned in 180,000 sites on a Google search "kudzu recipes" but not mentioned once in the search for bread here means that I might be giving something valuable, and it might be important to explore what I am introducing.  We have more than one child in this country going to sleep hungry, and kudzu is free. Cooking with kudzu has to be artistic, and there are bread recipes including kudzu--but not here. If the artisan breads here are only for the rich, or those who are prone to gout, then you are right, I do not belong here and you have saved me after my third post.

I read the Peter Reinhart article in the Charlotte Observer http://www.charlotte.com/439/story/331232.html about learning bread making, and although I am gluten intolerant and do not handle yeast because of health reasons, I thought it would be interesting science and that I would be welcome as an innovative cook who is still learning at an advanced age  I am older than I look, perhaps because I am blonde and the grey does not show as much. But even if I were much younger, I would expect a more civil tone, and at least a chance to share something that is not mentioned once here. I sincerely hope you did not address me the harsh way you did  I appear young and I am blonde and female.

In the last seven years we have had terrible fires, Katrina, Rita, 9/11, war and drought. To mention a survival food related to snow peas in relation to bread sounds interesting and perhaps important to me, even if done badly as my second post. I could go on, but I am afraid what I say would fall on deaf ears.  

 

 

 

Charlotte Fairchild

http://www.kudzus.blogspot.com

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thread-jacking means taking over a discussion with one's own personal agenda. For example, on this site when someone asks about how to get their crust crunchier, to answer with something about kudzu (or emmer or low carb diets) would be thread-jacking. I'm not saying that you would do that, but we have had people in the past who did.

I could go on, but I am afraid what I say would fall on deaf ears.

That is probably true.

Everyone on this site has other interests and our own beliefs, dietary and otherwise. Thankfully, the internet is a big place, and there are places we can go to find other people who'd like to discuss our other interests. If someone is interested in kudzu, I am quite OK with them going to one of the other 180,000 sites on the internet you mentioned.

This site is for bread lovers. If you are one of us, please join in the discussion. If not, no hard feelings, I certainly don't expect everyone to care as much about crust as I do, but please show us respect by letting us discuss our loaves in peace.

You have provided the link to your blog at least twice now, so people know where to go if they want to learn more about kudzu. I wish you health and happiness as you travel down the path you are traveling, but I think it is a different path than that I and most of the other folks on this site are on.

browndog's picture
browndog

Here's an idea, Charotte. You make a batch of kudzu bread, post pictures of the process start to finish, and share that. If it looks remotely interesting and/or edible, you are  likely to generate at least a little discussion.

fertileprayers's picture
fertileprayers

That is a great idea. I used a marijuana recipe for brownies to make kudzu brownies, and Juanita Baldwin, and perhaps Carole Marsh (The kudzu cookbook) have already made the bread, pancakes, waffles with kudzu they dried and added to the bread recipes.

 

I don't follow recipes very well. I get innovative and try to play too much with recipes, although I follow soufle pound cake recipes to the letter because I found out the hard way that no matter how many times you try to make a cake with self rising flour, it just won't work.

 

If you don't have a sense of humor with my posts, then you might miss out on something no one else is offering. Kudzu covers 7 million acres of the US, is in Maine, and Washington State and is slated for the Great Lakes in the next 10 to 20 years, and Canada is giving grants because they believe it is a threat. But next to Cogon grass it is a wimp (Jim Miller, US Forest Service). There is a Uganda recipe for the rhizome for cogon grass I am trying to get.

I dried some kudzu, but after a few days it turned whitish, and I am afraid that dried kudzu might still have mold/fungus which my immune system can't handle. If I make a bread, it will be with buckwheat and kudzu, with either stevia or salt. I have to admit, I usually eat kudzu raw in liquid, whole or chopped up form. I also admit that I may be the strangest cook on this planet--and safer as a raw vegetarian.

 

Juanita Baldwin has really good directions on drying kudzu, but I do not own any of her books. I will ask her to perhaps look at this site and offer a recipe or suggestion. The library system has all of her books, but it takes a while to get them, and then I can only keep them a couple of weeks, so I will order it again and I will try to offer something useful, nutritious and artsy (and since it is bread and I am in Georgia, fartsy).

 

Charlotte Fairchild

http://www.kudzus.blogspot.com