The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

first you get out your 100 yr old iron skillet

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

first you get out your 100 yr old iron skillet

then you make your crust and top it and bake and eat...pretty simple...when you have all the right "stuff". I am so lucky that I have my Mom and Grandmom's iron skillets...nothing cooks like old iron. This one is 12" across the top and 3" deep. It is paper thin in the middle...Momma called it her chicken fryer. Her Mom used to put bread to soak on a back burner with warm milk and butter and sugar. This was during the depression . That was supper when Momma got home from working at the telephone company as an operator in Toledo OH. 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Wow!  That looks mouthwatering good.

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

We ate 1/2 of it :) Can hardly wait for the leftovers. Topped  with fresh mozz and feta then  with sauteed red onions and mushrooms. A small amount of sauce and  Then  parmesan. Baked 30 min at 450 and finished for 2 min under the broiler. The bottom of the crust gets so crisp. You will have to try it.  I wanted to make a sicilian crust but didn't have the time or any semolina flour so will try that next. Thanks for looking !  c

STUinlouisa's picture
STUinlouisa

That looks really good. Cast iron is the way to go with thick crust pizza. I think older cast iron is superior to modern lighter and smoother due to better casting procedures used then,  in spite of what Lodge contends.

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

there is nothing like old cast iron. I have a lot of it and when I see and feel the new stuff I just walk away. Thanks for looking !  c

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

for brunch and seeing this is near torture.  I ruined my old CI skillet making bread and putting water in it for steam.  Totally rusted out and makes me ill :-(  Oh Well  bought a Combo Cooker to replace it,

\Happy baking Trail

tvuongpham's picture
tvuongpham

It isn't ruined. I hope you didn't throw it away

You can still salvage it. Don't lose hope.  

Not too difficult. It just takes time

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-restore-a-rusty-cast-iron-skillet-cleaning-lessons-from-the-kitchn-203086

I found an old cast iron pan while shopping for antique's in Vermont.

I stripped it of the old baked on seasoning.. sanded down the rust spots and re-seasoned it.. 

Took a couple days but nothing a little elbow grease and a slab of bacon - or crisco can't fix!

tvuongpham's picture
tvuongpham

It isn't ruined. I hope you didn't throw it away

You can still salvage it. Don't lose hope.  

Not too difficult. It just takes time

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-restore-a-rusty-cast-iron-skillet-cleaning-lessons-from-the-kitchn-203086

I found an old cast iron pan while shopping for antique's in Vermont.

I stripped it of the old baked on seasoning.. sanded down the rust spots and re-seasoned it.. 

Took a couple days but nothing a little elbow grease and a slab of bacon - or crisco can't fix!

PalwithnoovenP's picture
PalwithnoovenP

Nothing like old cookwares that has served the family for quite a long time. I think dishes become special when made in them.